Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've got two days, and about 100 miles in on the 19t. For those still contemplating the move (you'll need a 36mm socket wrench), here's my take on what you get, and what you give up.
1."Longer legs" in all of the intermediate gears. With the 18t, I found myself "racing to 5th gear", and using 5th anywhere from about 45 mph on up.
With the 19t, I can run each gear out (seemingly) much further, and don't shift up to 5th until around 58 mph.
2. Top gear at 60 mph dropped from 4K rpm to about 3600 rpm. The engine seems to NEED to be above 3K rpm to live, and actually starts to wake up at about 3500 rpm, so you can interpret this change any way you want to.
3. Starting out in first gear: I ride solo about 98% of the time, on mostly flat terrain, weighing in at around 185 pounds, so the perceived small amount of extra effort in getting under way is not a problem.
When Carol climbs on the back (hasn't happened yet...darned backrest from Triumph has been on order for a month!), and we have to start out on a grade, that could be a bit dodgy.
My riding style may well be more sedate than the average RAT folk, so the 19t bit may be better suited to my situation than yours.
Submitted for your approval..........
Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,014 Posts
Thank you sir. This is a subject I've been following since I got the bike. We go about the same weight, and most of my riding is around town with some occasional freeway thrown in. It seems worthwhile. I'll make my mind up one of these days.:cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,588 Posts
Buy a V-Twin and you can put-put around at even lower rpm.:D I run the stock 17 tooth on my '03 T-100 and have cruised all day at 5500 rpm, getting 50+ mpg. This is fast enough to get one a ticket on most roads if the LEO's catch you.

These motors are built for considerably more rpm than the V-Twin. It doesn't hurt them one bit to run down the road between 4 and 6 Thousand rpm!....in fact, they will probably last much longer than if you lug them around at lower rpm's. I realize the Triumph Engineers don't know anything about the bikes they design.:) They changed from the 17 tooth to the 18 tooth counter sprockets when they changed to the 865 with different cams and cam timing which produced more torque at lower rpms. The speedies originally had a 16 tooth counter sprocket as stock. If I ever change to a different configuration on mine, I will try a 16.:D

Changing "pre-programming of the brain" seems to be VERY difficult when it comes to engine rpm. Even some Tiger 1050 riders change counter-sprockets to ones with more teeth. That really strikes me strange. If I covered the tach on the Tiger, I couldn't guess the rpm and get within 2000 rpm of the correct value--it is that smooth at all rpm's. By the way, my Bonnie is VERY smooth between 5K and 5.5K rpm.

Let the flaming begin..........:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
V-twins, rpms, etc.

RedBird,
I got rid of the V-twin to get the T100.
Darned if I know what the rpms were on that thing, as it didn't have a tach.
Funny thing, though: It DID have a 6-speed tranny!
I know what you mean. You get used to a particular sound, or feel, and anything else seems strange, or even wrong.
Bear in mind, though: Prior to my 5 months on the Harley, I did the previous 10 years on a '98 T-bird, which ran a few more revs, so I've seen both sides.
I go more by the "feel" of the bike and how it responds than by the actual tach reading. The bike seems (to me) to be happy with the 19t, but then, it wasn't complaining about the 18t.
I'll stick with the 19 for a while. I put about 250 miles on the 18t, so the chain should still recognize either of them if I decide to switch back.
The big test will probably come this weekend when we do the first two-up trip (called the dealer: The backrest is FINALLY in!).
Stay tuned!
Bob

Buy a V-Twin and you can put-put around at even lower rpm.:D I run the stock 17 tooth on my '03 T-100 and have cruised all day at 5500 rpm, getting 50+ mpg. This is fast enough to get one a ticket on most roads if the LEO's catch you.

These motors are built for considerably more rpm than the V-Twin. It doesn't hurt them one bit to run down the road between 4 and 6 Thousand rpm!....in fact, they will probably last much longer than if you lug them around at lower rpm's. I realize the Triumph Engineers don't know anything about the bikes they design.:) They changed from the 17 tooth to the 18 tooth counter sprockets when they changed to the 865 with different cams and cam timing which produced more torque at lower rpms. The speedies originally had a 16 tooth counter sprocket as stock. If I ever change to a different configuration on mine, I will try a 16.:D

Changing "pre-programming of the brain" seems to be VERY difficult when it comes to engine rpm. Even some Tiger 1050 riders change counter-sprockets to ones with more teeth. That really strikes me strange. If I covered the tach on the Tiger, I couldn't guess the rpm and get within 2000 rpm of the correct value--it is that smooth at all rpm's. By the way, my Bonnie is VERY smooth between 5K and 5.5K rpm.

Let the flaming begin..........:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,408 Posts
My '03 T100 came with a 17 tooth sprocket. Only after opening up the breathing on my 790 did I put on an 18 tooth. I'm pleased with the gearing as it is set up. The 19T sprocket would take away too much snap for my tastes. I operate my bike between 3K and 5.5K on mostly secondary country roads and the 18 is just right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,872 Posts
There are 2 things to look at as far as gearing goes.
1# where you ride most if on the high way you want ether a 18 or 19 .A 17 is ok for around town stop light to stop light play.
#2 how much power your bike makes and what rpm it makes it.865 motors stock are about done making power above 6500 rpm.Older 790 make power up to around 7500 to 8000 rpms.
lower gears will feel like your faster but you may not be any faster.watch the speedo climb not the tach.The more ft/lbs you make the more teeth you can run up front.You are no way luging these motors at 4000 rpm that is where most of them start making power.By todays standards these are not high reving bikes stock ,there higher reving then v-twins but they are not jap bikes.On the open road they will wear less at 4000 rpm then 5500 rpm if you run them a long ways.17 is just to much for high way travel on my bike I run a 18.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,872 Posts
One other thing that that should be looked at is how much you weigh and if you ride 2 up,if your heavy or ride 2 up you may need another tooth up front.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,588 Posts
Mike, I think on your last post you meant to say you may need one less tooth up front?:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Going to a 140/80 rear tyre over the 130/80 and leaving the 18 tooth on is a nice compromise between the 18 and 19.
;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
19t: UPDATE

Well, I finally got the Triumph backrest and NB luggage rack installed last night, and loaded Carol on the back to see how that worked out.
She said the seat (with a strapped-on sheepskin covered gel pad) worked just fine and the "high" (yeah, right!) backrest was quite comfortable. I set the preload on the (stock) shocks up to the 2nd notch which seemed to carry our combined weight very comfortably.
AND, (drum roll, please!), the effort required to get off the line while two-up was virtually indistinguishable from the solo riding experience, even on the few slight grades I tried.
BOTTOM LINE: If you want to have use of some other gears in the box besides 5th, and you are not necessarily into wheelies, burnouts, and other sorts of "hooligan" riding, the 19t MIGHT just suit you fine.
Hey, it's about $20 to try it, and who knows? You might just LIKE it as I do! :)
Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,408 Posts
Great news, Bob. It sounds as though you're getting the bike set up just the way you need it. Perhaps I will try the 19 down the road. The terrain in Louisiana is not super-demanding from a grades standpoint after all. Happy highways...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
395 Posts
If I did alot of interstate riding the 19 tooth sprocket would be the way to go. Where I live it's almost always back roads and rural highways. I just removed my airbox and put the 17 tooth on mine. I can't believe the difference in performance. The bike is an absolute blast to ride now. It feels much quicker and the fun factor is high. Gas mileage is definitely going to suffer, I can't seem to stay off the throttle!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,908 Posts
I guess I must be a hooligan then. I'm running a 17 and thinking about trying a 16. I rarely get out of third running around town, so it shouldn't be a problem. The bike does like the high revs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,200 Posts
A sprocket

What are you guys thinking when changing a sprocket? Do most of you replace chain, rear sprocket and front? Do you leave the chain and rear sprocket intact and just install the new drive sprocket?
I've always thought that you should replace all sprockets and chain but assume a slightly worn chain and sprocket, say, less than a thousand miles, would be okay to just change the front and leave the rest in place.
What's the consensus from Y'all?
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
Top