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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need the Triumph part number for the correct 18t front sprocket for my 99 Legend. My dealer can find them for Americas and Bonnies, and perhaps they are the same? Can't find anything except the 17t on Bike bandit, and of course, there are no Triumph numbers listed there. Also, I have a new chain guide rubbing block coming, but my bike only has 4000 on it. While I would like to go up one tooth on front, would I be better waiting until the chain needs replacing too? I am concerned that a new sprocket with the factory chain at 4000 might have issues? Also, in the factory manual, they talk about replacing the chain in one piece by removing the subframe. Everything I have read uses a riveting tool to put on the new chain with the attachable link. I am assuming the subframe removal route must be long and tedious, at least enough so to outweigh the advantage of having a solid chain with no riveted links? If so, can anyone recommend a good chain tool? All the reviews I've seen don't exactly rave about what is available.
 

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can't help you with a part number but can with the rest.

At 4000 you wont need to fit the new rubbing strip - it'll only be half worn unless you ride very rough roads or routinely overload the bike (>375 pounds IIRC). As your mileage is low you should be able to get away with swapping that sprocket without doing the chain so long as the chain and old sprockets look to have little visible wear. Even the replacement chains from Triumph now use a revetting tool AFAIK. I'll let others chip in with recommendations there as I haven't bought one for decades.
 

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I agree with Mick that there's not likely any need to change the chain or rubbing block at that mileage if reasonable lubing & adjustment has been carried out.

But when there is...

I can't point you to a specific make of tool, but I suggest you look around & buy a quality item. Look for a known good tool brand and/or buy from a shop that's offering mainly good quality pro workshop tools.

The 'soft link' you get with a chain is only soft at the end. A little care when fitting is needed to avoid the pin breaking where it's hardened. Don't overdo squishing the soft end. But you can't see how much it spreads as you tighten, aiming for an even gap for the rubber o-rings. I always make sure now that I've a spare soft link to hand to start again if need be.

Also..

You'll need a sprocket cover gasket & having a clutch pushrod seal on hand is a good idea. Never had a problem with the gearchange shaft seal - just take care sliding over the splines. I'm a tightwad & usually reuse the sprocket tab washer. (But have a new one to hand, if needed.)

The sprocket nut is highly torqued & it's very difficult to hold the chain/sprocket from moving. An air impact socket driver is the right tool, but I have a cheap 12V electric one, designed for wheel nuts, which does the job nicely. (No need to hold the chain this way.)

IME, aftermarket sprockets from a reputable supplier are totally fine (& cheaper).
 

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Chain Rivet (ing)

Small ball pein hammer, small vice grips, solid steel rod (heavier the better) and an assistant. Slacken off chain adjusters, break old chain, fix new chain to old (ends of) with light gauge wire, ensure neutral is selected, pull new chain onto gearbox sprocket (if not intending to replace same), continue pulling new chain until ends are on rear sprocket and adjacent to one and other, fit 'soft link' and collar, have assistant place end of steel bar through spokes and onto the back of the 'soft link', grip the collar and rear of the soft link with small vice grips, whilst the assistant applies pressure with the steel rod gently pein the copper tips of the link untill they form a uniform mushroom shape onto the collar, try not to create 'splits' in the copper. Remove the grips, adjust chain, all done. No need to remove gearbox sprocket cover unless actually replacing sprocket.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks to all for the info. I found a part number on the sprint forum for the 18t sprocket, in case anyone else needs it. It is T1180177. If you look this up on Bike Bandit, it will come up searching Triumph parts, but it will not come up if you have already set the filters to 1999 and Legend. Same with many other interchangeable parts. I just discovered this last night, and thought I'd mention it for anyone else who has had difficulty finding parts which won't come up on a search. I also found a store that was supposed to have the microfiche pictures to find a part, and then enter the number to order it, but no microfiche comes up. Anyone know of a site that has this, with the Triumph part numbers showing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Update

I installed the 18 tooth front sprocket, and just finished about 150 miles on it tonight. In a wide variety of riding, from interstate to mountainous terrain to city driving, the 18 tooth is superior in every way. It seems a better match for the power band of this engine (at least for my riding style, which is not aggressive). I did not notice a disadvantage when starting from a dead stop, and the rpms are about 4100 at 65 mph. If anyone is interested, I posted the Triumph part number earlier in this thread.
 
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