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My 2007 BB is getting close to12000 miles. It has been great. I was wondering what I can expect to pay for the 12k service,normal parts labor etc.
 

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In same boat

I also have a 2007 Bonnie and in fact hit 12,000 mi. on my way to work today. I was quoted around $465 or so a few weeks ago. I told myself that I would take it into the dealer for this service, but now (with the help from this great forum) I'm considering doing it myself. Seems like the biggest hurdles are having the right tools and checking the valves seems like the biggest job. Is a Haynes or shop manual required or just the owners manual and info. from this forum?
 

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little harder

OK, after reading up more on this 12000 mile service. It's looking just a tad harder than I thought. I'm not that much of a mechanic. So, maybe for this first one I'll have the dealer do it. One question: I just changed the oil a few miles back, can they do the service without changing the oil again?

PS. Don't mean to be hijacking the thread.
 

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Keep in mind .... checking the valve clearance vs removing cams and replacing shims are two different things. Even if you don't want to pull the cams (and all the associated locating pins, cam caps, etc), checking them is easy.

Here's a little drawing I put together a while back that shows the position the cam should be in relation to the shim/tappet. Bump each cam lobe to that position via the rear wheel (as others have already said, easier to bump in fifth gear with bike on center stand or jack).

http://s115.photobucket.com/albums/n284/bcgilligan/?action=view&current=OHCValveClearance2.jpg

I found all my valve clearances ok at 12k, and didn't have to do any shim replacement until approx 21k miles. Recently checked again at 35k, and all was well.

If you don't have the mechanical experience, don't let a couple of us old motorheads coax you into this by saying "simple ...see"! If you've never worked on a gasoline engine, and don't know a tappet from a trumpet, a good dealer (emphasis on good) may be the way to go. I'd rather see you pay $400, than have you bust up something on the bike simply because we said to go for it!

Bob
 

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As another note, you don't have to use Triumph branded shims; they're four times the price and my dealer doesn't keep them in stock, not to mention the dealer is 80kms away. I go to my local Yamaha dealer and get the shims there. The shims are pretty generic, 24 or 25mm diameter I think.

I personally would never use a caliper to measure my shims, it's not precise enough, especially when you can go to a local machine tool supplier and buy a cheap micrometer for $15 - 20.

I think cams are a good upgrade too, but all the Triumph ones are crazy expensive compared to other brands of bikes.
 

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25mm diameter, they are the same ones used on honda CB750s from 1979 to 1982 - so that gives you a model to look up. I can't remember what yamaha they are ysed on, but yes they are used there too.

My dealer does not charge any different to Honda dealers, and keeps shims in stock. But there you are - not all dealers are alike.
 

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Just FYI, Triumph shims are graded finer than any others out there by half (meaning that Triumph makes "half-sizes" of shims, and everyone else only makes "whole sizes"). Depending on where your clearances fall and what shims you currently have in, you may be able to get them closer to where you want them with the expensive Triumph shims.
 

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when I checked the valve clearances on my bike at 12,000 miles, found it was not necessary to re-shim.

the clearances were in the middle tolerance.

I was amazed that the cam lobes had hardly any scuffing marks etc and looked brand new. its not like that I treat my bike with kid gloves either and only change the oil at 6000 miles
 

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when I checked the valve clearances on my bike at 12,000 miles, found it was not necessary to re-shim.

the clearances were in the middle tolerance.

I was amazed that the cam lobes had hardly any scuffing marks etc and looked brand new. its not like that I treat my bike with kid gloves either and only change the oil at 6000 miles
Shimming is usually not necessary on account of cam wear but more because the seating of the valves and valve wear. When I adjusted my clearance there was no noticeable wear on the shims or lobes, but in in some cases the clearance was .005" out of tolerance.
 
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