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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
well fellas i'm kinda stuck here and am looking for some advice. my 2007 thrux is sitting just a few miles below the 12,000 mile mark and the weather is breaking and i need to get her back on the road. in order to pass inspection i need a new rear sport demon and while it's at the dealership i'm going to have an oil change.

it's my understanding that i will also be due for a valve inspection/adjustment and that i will need the fork oil changed as well. the problem is that i'm very short on funds (slow at work and on commision) and the tire and oil change are already almost more than i can part with. will it be ok to slide on the valve inspection /adjustment for a couple thousand miles or should i just let her sit until i can get everything done at once?

for the record i have always done everything the service schedule has told me to do and i intend on handling the valves as soon as i have some extra coin (next couple months or so). am i risking a major engine catastrophe or should it be ok?

thank you,
dirty

 

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For starters, take the wheel off yourself and just have the dealer mount and balance the tire. Also do your own oil change, that'll save you a few dollars, and it's easy to do.

If you want to be a little bit more ambitious, it's not that hard to change the fork oil--remove one fork at a time and dump out the oil.

I would think that the valve check can wait a few thousand miles. There's nothing magic about 12,000. It's just what the engineers decided would be reasonable.

I'm nearly at 12,000 too and I'm going to do the valve job myself. The special tool and locking pins, some shims, some odds and ends of seals and gaskets, and the new digital micrometer together are cheaper than paying the dealer to do it, and it'll be a good learning experience.

If you need a motorcycle lift, the money you save from doing one or two of these jobs yourself will more than pay for it. Hint: Support the back wheel with a cinder block or some wood when you remove the front wheel or the whole thing will tip backward off the lift.
 

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Valves

12000 mi is just a reference mark. Got ftriends w/ 26000 mi on the clock & no valve anything yet! If there is a steady click- its time! If not- just listen & feel for power loss. There is NO magical mark to do the valves. A compression test may help calm your feers as well? If it aint broke- dont fix it!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
thanks for the responses. i guess i was just trying to get a little peace of mind but there is no way i'm attempting any of it myself except for the oil change which i will start doing once my warranty is up. anyone have any ideas what the dealer might charge for the valve inspection/adjustment? $100? $200? $500? thanks again.
 

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Just looked in my owner's manual - fork oil change at 24 thousand.
I would think for only a valve adjustment check would be closer to $200, but call your shop and find out.
 

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Triumph Service WAY High $$

I had 12K service without oil change and filter on my Speedmaster last year. Service included valve check, new spark plugs, new brake fluid, chain adjust, and other checks. Valves did not need adjusting. San Diego dealer.

TOTAL COST $667 (U.S)

According to my friends with BMW 1150RT and Harley Softail, Triumph service costs more; way out of line. This is one of the issues with Triumph. There are very few dealers around so you're usually stuck with only one option -- if you want mechanics with Triumph experience; same goes if you need service on a trip outside major metropolitan areas. While I like the SM a lot, I'm not sure I'm going to go for the Thunderbird I've been considering.
 

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I had 12K service without oil change and filter on my Speedmaster last year. Service included valve check, new spark plugs, new brake fluid, chain adjust, and other checks. Valves did not need adjusting. San Diego dealer.

TOTAL COST $667 (U.S)

According to my friends with BMW 1150RT and Harley Softail, Triumph service costs more; way out of line. This is one of the issues with Triumph. There are very few dealers around so you're usually stuck with only one option -- if you want mechanics with Triumph experience; same goes if you need service on a trip outside major metropolitan areas. While I like the SM a lot, I'm not sure I'm going to go for the Thunderbird I've been considering.
Yeah, that's way steep...and no freaking oil/filter!!!
The shop around here charges, I think, $87 an hour labor. I guess they use a guide like car mechanics for flat rates of various jobs.
Triumph twins are such uncomplicated motorcycles that all but the truly non-mechanical or unwilling can do nearly everything.
Everybody should have a buddy that knows a bit about engines...and plumbing...and computers...and....:D
 

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I had 12K service without oil change and filter on my Speedmaster last year. Service included valve check, new spark plugs, new brake fluid, chain adjust, and other checks. Valves did not need adjusting. San Diego dealer.

TOTAL COST $667 (U.S)

According to my friends with BMW 1150RT and Harley Softail, Triumph service costs more; way out of line. This is one of the issues with Triumph. There are very few dealers around so you're usually stuck with only one option -- if you want mechanics with Triumph experience; same goes if you need service on a trip outside major metropolitan areas. While I like the SM a lot, I'm not sure I'm going to go for the Thunderbird I've been considering.

$667! Great Googly Moogly! That's a lot! Especially for just adjustments and checks.
 

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Valve service cost

I was quoted $350 for the valve check and adjustment by a reputable independent mechanic, not sure if that includes shims. If I remember correctly, my dealer wants about $450.

I'm going to do it myself this season. I haven't done it before, but I do have confidence in my mechanical ability.
 

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I had a small motorcycle repair shop do my 12,000. Oil change filter
(amsoil) valve check and a new front tire put on as well. It cost me $347.00 US and the valves were dead on specs.
 

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well fellas i'm kinda stuck here and am looking for some advice. my 2007 thrux is sitting just a few miles below the 12,000 mile mark and the weather is breaking and i need to get her back on the road. in order to pass inspection i need a new rear sport demon and while it's at the dealership i'm going to have an oil change.

it's my understanding that i will also be due for a valve inspection/adjustment and that i will need the fork oil changed as well. the problem is that i'm very short on funds (slow at work and on commision) and the tire and oil change are already almost more than i can part with. will it be ok to slide on the valve inspection /adjustment for a couple thousand miles or should i just let her sit until i can get everything done at once?

for the record i have always done everything the service schedule has told me to do and i intend on handling the valves as soon as i have some extra coin (next couple months or so). am i risking a major engine catastrophe or should it be ok?

thank you,
dirty

Get the valve adjustment done . Screw the fluid changes ( except the oil) since the bike is under 4 yrs old . As for the tire throw the bike on a lift , take the rear wheel off and get it changed . www.tireexpress.com( tirexpress?) has tires at a good deal with free shipping .
You'll be okay .
 

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Valve pricing

The valve check should be priced separately from the valve adjustment, and should be cheap, because it only involves removing the cam cover, turning the engine, and checking the clearances.

With some luck, that'll be the end of it.

I wouldn't pay $350 to find out that no adjustment was needed.

So maybe you could check the clearances yourself first, and proceed from there. You might get lucky.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
thought i would attach some related material....
 

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Dirtydutch

I respect that if your not a mechanic or mechanically inclined you may pay much more.(In the long haul for attempting the shade tree route)and causing damage, or more repair.
A Valve adjustment is easy on a shim and bucket and it is way easier on a screw/nut adjuster.
Your Bike has a Range of accepted clearance for the intakes and exhaust valves.(All Triumph Parallel twins of modern build use a shim and bucket valve adjustment with single overhead cams one intake & one exhaust)
On something like a BMW air/oil head (Boxer) Or like the old VW's they have a Tappet(Lifter) the cam is inside the engine block. It pushes the lifter that pushes a push rod.That goes to a Rocker arm that has a adjustment that is a threaded rod. With a little foot that rests on top of the valve through the rocker There is the adjusting screw and lock nut, It is here that you would drag your feeler gauge in between the adjustment screw and valve stem and tighten or loosen the Gap to give the correct clearance.....Confuse you enough?
Good....
The valve would be closed and that cylinder would be at top dead center.(Piston sitting at the top of the stroke (compression) to the top ready to travel downward after it has fired.

The reason I am telling you all of this about a type of adjustment you do not have?

Well it is because this is what most people think that they have for their adjustment, and that this is what is going to be done to adjust the valves.

An engine with a shim and bucket has the Cam(s) & they are overhead (inside the cylinder head(s) On Top (not inside the engine block.) There is no adjustment screw, rocker push rod or tappet/lifter).The cam(s)s are driven by a chain or belt with tension(Cam tension) and gears on a jack shaft synchronize and drive the camshaft(s).

Now imagine say a shim like a washer the size of a Quarter, perfectly flat and smooth on both sides and a(n) exact thickness.Say (.005) thousands of an inch.With a shim and bucket design on an overhead cam designed engine, these shims "Adjust" your valve clearance.They're the spacers that create the clearance.
This "Washer" could be .075,080.or.085 etc. so what ever the clearance is it can be spaced with the correct "Washer"

So is it easy to adjust your valves? Yes it is.

Now if the valve clearance is too large (Loose)you'll change the shim (to a thicker)that will tighten up the clearance.If the clearance is too tight (small) you'll change the shim (to a thinner)to loosen up the clearance.****Always have a manual and know the procedure, torques and so forth****

Good news!!! This type of adjustment generally doesn't shift or change all that much after the engine is broken in (run in).
With that said the first adjustment is the most likely one to have movement.Normally the valves may get tighter.Not a good situation as the clearance is for overlap so you do not burn the seats(Normally the area of damage) But what I wanted you to understand is that there is no "magic" mileage or time (Hours) that the engine turns into a pumpkin.

So understand that you need to check and adjust your valves but the Shim and buckets with a overhead cam designed engine is way more "Forgiving" when the valve adjustments are needed, and how much "Movement" has occurred. ****You Have a pretty large cushion before any real problems, just don't waste your grace period and you'll be just fine!!****

Most importantly is you really have a "Range" designed into the adjustments.So even if your a little out of range... it is very unlikely that any engine problems will or have occurred.
My point is that the shims come in lets say five thousand (.005)increments thus you can only tighten or loosen it with in that "range". The screw/nut with a tappet/push rod style the adjustment is infinitely in range. But it has the mechanical hardship on it that can cause it to need more frequent adjustment.

The question for the mechanic maybe your shim shows that there is a space of .002 or two thousands before there is a 0 clearance.Way too tight but remember that the increments are .005 or five thousands of an inch with the shims.so when you adjust you have to add or subtract .005 not .003 or three thousands of an inch that would with the .002 make your adjustment perfect. At .005 increments our only choice is .005
So we have to add the .005 larger shim irregardless, bringing the clearance into the .007 range It maybe that a clearance of .010 is the recommended clearance and better a little tight than loose the .002 added to a .010 larger shim brings that adjustment to .012 a little loose rather than .007 that is a little tight but both are acceptable in the range but the .012 is preferable as it is closer to the "spec" and since we know in new engines valve clearance usually gets a little tighter, not until the engine gets really old do we need to worry about everything starting to get rattly and loose. and after a few months and several brisk rides that valve may tighten .002 and next adjustment your at .010 or perfect and you would just leave that shim in place.

So if your Thruxton is Popping and backfiring heavily the ehaust valves may be tight.If it pops and clicks and has a fairly large loss of power the Intakes maybe tight.

If the valves are Loose you will hear a lot of valve train rattle and generally makes your bike sound awful and it will have a loss of power.But surprise, the danger is less of harmful engine damage and more of crappy performance and ratty engine sounds. As my mechanic buddy says "A loose valve, is a happy valve"

Generally they(a lot of engine manufactures of all types of vehicles) have been heading this way for years,since it was discovered how soft valve seats are since unleaded gasoline came on the market set valves (all of them as equally slightly loose) The seat material and all alloys in general have come light years from where they used to be.

As the "Range",set loose at the factory (very slightly) and as the bike Runs it it "adjusts"(As they naturally seat in) the slightly Loose valves into perfect adjustment.At least that is what is hoped for. The material used in these engines today is very ,very good.The valves will seat and need to be adjusted, but I know of shim and bucket engines that after they run in and the first couple Valve adjustments they never come out of adjustment again,or they all seem to "adjust" together rather than having a "troubled" single valve that keeps coming out of adjustment on its own.

Also...... by the way..... the shims are the exact same shims used In Honda's 650 XL (the older 1993 till present.... I think they still make it???)
The Kawasaki 1000 four cylinders engines Parallel versions (Like the cops used years ago 70's thru 90's.And the Kawasaki KLR 650 Still being made and most likely will be made forever and it uses the same shims)

So.... with that much use, the shims are not rare or expensive.

I think they cost about $5.00 each at the Triumph dealer, but The Honda ,Kawasaki and most likely aftermarket shims are cheap.(cost)
I have a box with the whole range that my buddy gave me after he got rid of his Honda and I needed them.
Also they "the dealer/mechanic" usually takes your old shim(s) out and they might put a used shim from another engine in.
Nothing wrong with that as long as it is not damaged and mic's out to the right thickness.So in general the shims are recycled indefinitely and and a shim that comes out of a engine that uses synthetic oil and has had regular service is just as good or equal to a brand new one and it might even be made out of better steel...Who Knows????

In the Factory service manual they warn you that the cap that holds the cams down IS PART OF THE HEAD and if you brake it your going to have to buy the cylinder head, Ouch!!! Expensive lesson.

So the pro mechanic with the knowledge isn't going to do that.
You would need a Torque wrench for sure and a good Snap On(brand) can cost around $500. Sure a cheap $50-$150 Craftsman (Brand) will work but you need to use that wrench to make up its cost and Most mechanics will not loan out there stuff except to other mechanics.I know I do not loan my tools!!

My friend has a neat little tool that saves time and money.
It makes it so you can compress the bucket with the shim on it and all you need to do then is measure it with your feeler gauge and remove it(the old one) with a magnet.then you slip in the right size(s)new one(s). Nice because you do not need to pull the cams saving time and reducing wear and tear.

I am not sure what it costs to check.. verses to adjust.. but to do it properly the adjustment is going to take more time and that is to recheck your shims after you switch them.

Seems to me dirtydutch, your smart enough to know that you have to do this adjustment, but If you only knew how many bikes with a valve train like your Thruxton has, that are running around that have never been even been checked once and the owner is lucky.

I have several KTM Twins and the adjustment from a dealer cost is between $500-700 depending if the shop is capable and It is mostly labor to get to the valves. You have to darn near remove all the parts of the bike.

But I will say this your pipe wrap on the header looks sick(I love it!!!) I think that your Thruxton is a real beauty. I have a 07 scrambler but if the thruxtons were a option for me I'd want mine to look alot like yours ....really nice scooter.
Get the tire get the inspection( I don't know what that involves for you) but I would do the Valves when you have the money set aside as your really in no danger unless like I said you think any of the noises I mentioned become predominate you should be fine.

Ride on!!!!!!
 

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RICKSD-

I had 12K service without oil change and filter on my Speedmaster last year. Service included valve check, new spark plugs, new brake fluid, chain adjust, and other checks. Valves did not need adjusting. San Diego dealer.

TOTAL COST $667 (U.S)
which san diego dealer was that? i went to rocket once and thought they were sort of rude, and cold have cared less if i came in there or not. when i moved i out here i was hoping to find a decent dealer nearby, and they are only a few miles from me, but i wont be going there again. in fact, after a spill i ordered all the parts i needed from a dealer up north and drove the 40 minutes to get the parts once they came in. it was more like one of those larger, corporate type dealers which i usually try to avoid, but i will say that dealer treated me very well and the customer service was top-notch. i do all my work myself, but occasionally use the dealer for special order parts, gaskets, etc. i need a new rear sport demon and will be taking the tire to GP motorsports instead of rocket. eventhough it isn't a triumph dealer those guys there seem to know their stuff and were very friendly when i went into the shop.

you could have easily done all that work yourself, maybe minus the valve check if you havent done it before of just dont feel comfortable attempting it by yourself. if you ever need anything done in the future feel free to send me a PM and i would be glad to help you out. i have a garage, lift, and i'm in clairemont. another member helped me out at first when i first bought the bike, and sice then it hasnt been to the dealer and i've done all the work myself, and as a result have a pretty decent collection of tools as well!
 
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