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Motards-online.com has a review up for the new Tiger, and he had over 1,000 miles in the saddle with it. Might have to register to read the article.

Key summary points in the article are:

Plus: "The torque is great all the way from 2.000rpm whether you have a heavy load or riding alone. If you are not riding on gravelled surfaces at all, the new and lighter Tiger 1050 is a more versatile machine than ever."

Minus: "When using the engine like that[working the motor around 7,000 rpm during spirited riding] I needed to use the gearbox a lot more. And it is the same old story with a disappointing feel when gearing up the box. My left toes hurts after a day in the seat and my boots are thick. This is one detail that Triumph have not improved much from previous 1050 models yet. The feel is horrible and unnecessary force has to be applied through the left foot. If Triumph could only build a Suzuki gearbox… But as I stated earlier, this is the one and only real niggle I have with the Tiger anno 2007. The rest is good, really good."
 

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Strange... My dealer's rep told me the gearbox WAS basically a Suzuki. I've never really experienced this 'sore toe syndrome', from zero to twelve-thousand miles. Maybe he should see his podiatrist.
 

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Assuming this beast has the same tranny as my Sprint 1050 then I don't know what he's talking about either. Shifts smooth and sure. Especially under hard acceleration. :???:
 

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Here's the text of the review...simply to avoid the hassle of registering. BigStripey, if it's too large of a post...I apologize. Wade

The Tiger have been long overdue an upgrade. It was one of the last models to still feature the 955 engine and now Triumph have launched a new Tiger with the 1050 triple engine, new chassis and brand new styling. We politely asked specifically for the albino Tiger, Triumph replied; Fusion white, its Fusion white!

In an ideal world you would be able to take one bike, go offroad with it, and then take it to a track day in Spain and tour back home on it. However that is nearly impossible due to this planet’s complex nature with complex surfaces. Triumph has reintroduced the Tiger as a much more capable sporting machine. There are still more suspension than on a sportbike, but upside-down fork, radial brake callipers, stronger swingarm and 114bhp shouts sport rather than the old more adventure styled 955. We racked up more than 1.000 miles on the first production Tiger 1050 to hit the roads.

As usual we started out our test doing motorway miles. This tells us how the bike is as a touring bike and we also added luggage on a 320 mile journey. Triumph has a fully developed luggage system for the new Tiger, but we had to do without. We strapped on the luggage in the old fashioned way. The only thing that stops you using soft luggage on the new Tiger 1050 (well, on the old 955 too) is the high exhaust on the right hand side. So we had to strap on the luggage so that it did not touch the hot part of the exhaust. It wasn’t too difficult, but it looks a bit odd and might mess up the handling a bit. At high speed we did struggle to keep a steady line due to the heavy autumn winds on the open motorways, but the front was more stable than for instance on the Honda CBF1000 that I tested with luggage a month ago. On the CBF1000 with luggage I was forced to slow down, I never felt I had to slow down on the Tiger 1050 despite the heavy side wind.

The seat is comfortable and I could handle one tank full after the other in relative comfort. I admit that I was pushing it a bit with regards to the speed (my average was very high whilst riding at night) and revs I used so the range can be compared with what you can do on the German autobahn where there is free speed limit. With that sort of riding I could do about 130 miles between stops and refill around 18 litres (with luggage and heavy wind). I can ride fuel economical as well and the Tiger can produce decent mileage per gallon when keeping the revs below 6.000rpm. My best run gave more than 200 miles on a tank-full. The fuel tank holds 20 litres of fuel. The new windscreen is very decent. Admittedly I rode my own naked Cagiva Raptor 1000 down to Hinckley to pick up the Tiger, so anything would be better than that, but still considering the high speed work I did with hardly any fatigue it gets the x for approved. To get a completely efficient protection against the wind the screen would need to be taller, but it does a very decent job at keeping wind of the chest region and only the top of my helmet were exposed. I did a couple of hundred miles with offroad helmet too and I had to bend forwards a bit to escape the wind. At normal pace the seating position is very natural and hence comfortable. The distance to the handlebars and foot pegs with an 835mm seat height suited me perfect. If you keep the revs high, above 6.000rpm, there are some vibrations in the bars, but the mirrors stay clear enough to keep a full overview of what’s going on behind us. The mirrors are very good and easy to adjust. The new S3 derived instrument panel have a lot of different features, from fuel consumption, top speed (141mph it still says on our Tiger…), clock and a lot more to keep you occupied. It’s just a shame that you can’t operate the buttons easily whilst riding. It would have been great to switch from the clock to MPG figures whilst on a long and boring ride on the motorway. The buttons are located towards the right hand side of the instruments and they are very small. I could adjust them on the move, but I can’t recommend anyone doing that as it takes your attention away from the road. Put the controls on the handlebars and it would be a much more useful touring feature. It is easy to read both the digital speedo and the analogue rev-counter whilst on the move.

The new Tiger front has been completely restyled and you can see some influence from the firms Daytona 675 on the double headlight. When we rode in the dark the lights were perfectly adjusted, which is not always the case on a press bike, and provided more than enough light to keep the pace up on half empty motorways. On the country lanes high beam provided enough light to get us safely through the decaying leafs and mud in many of the bends. The Michelin Pilot Road tyres provided very good wet-grip too so we have had 1000 safe miles on the 07 Tiger 1050. The new wheels are the same size as on the average sportbike, they fit a 120/70-17 tyre at the front and 180/55-17 at the rear. Wheels and tyres are sporty, but so are the new chassis, swing-arm and suspension. The USD fork provides really good front end grip and feedback and on the front wheel Triumph has attached four pot radial callipers from Nissin. The suspension is not too hard and perhaps on the soft side for really hard riding. But both front and rear suspension benefits from full adjustability. Suspension, chassis, brakes and wheels are all components that previously have been reserved the sporty Sprint ST and Speed Triple models.

This brings us to the 1050cc triple engine that also derives from the ST and S3 models. Due to a big single muffler that single handed has to handle Euro 3, the new Tiger produces a bit less peak power than its even more sporty siblings. A claimed [email protected] and [email protected] are the claimed max figures. According to one Dyno-sheet we have seen a good one can do even more measured at the clutch and around 110hp at the rear wheel. Triumph also told us that with the replacement exhaust there is more to release than the usual 10bhp. Regardless of the hard facts, the engine feels powerful enough and the torque is impressive from low rpm figures. I happily accelerated from 2.000 rpm in high gears as the transmission never argued and from 3.000rpm the engine pushes strongly. Never a need to gear down to overtake which is good as our only niggle with the 2007 Tiger is just the gearbox. When I say happily I mean that I actually was riding that way most of the time and not just to test it. The 1050 triple runs very smoothly on idle and low rpms. Not too different from a four, but when you decide you want some fun and use the revs the white Tiger-beast awakes with a roar. Horsepower takes over from the steady torque curve at around 7.000 rpm (which tells us again how important torque are for a road machine) and sends the front towards the air if you want it to. When using the engine like that I needed to use the gearbox a lot more. And it is the same old story with a disappointing feel when gearing up the box. My left toes hurts after a day in the seat and my boots are thick. This is one detail that Triumph have not improved much from previous 1050 models yet. The feel is horrible and unnecessary force has to be applied through the left foot. If Triumph could only build a Suzuki gearbox… But as I stated earlier, this is the one and only real niggle I have with the Tiger anno 2007. The rest is good, really good.

Conclusion
After three weeks in the Tiger 1050 seat and more than 1.000 miles on every type of road apart from gravel (no point even thinking about taking the 07 Tiger offroad, it’s not a real adventure machine anymore) it’s only the Triumph testers themselves that have done more miles on one at the point of writing. I really like the 1050 triple engine despite the fact it has less power than the Sprint ST and Speed Triple. The torque is great all the way from 2.000rpm whether you have a heavy load or riding alone. If you are not riding on gravelled surfaces at all, the new and lighter Tiger 1050 is a more versatile machine than ever. Town, motorway, A and B road are all consumed with great appetite, a Tiger’s appetite.
 

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That's another good review, I am reading in all the reviews what I was hoping to hear. Can't wait to get mine and start putting some miles on her.
He did mention in this article that he did not like the fact that the Tiger has less power than the ST & S3, but all you have to do is install the TORS and you have darn near as much power as the stock S3. Myself, I was quite happy with the way my stock '06 S3 performed. If I can have that in a package such as the Tiger, this will be the bike I have been looking for.
 

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Hey SalMaglie, don't worry about the stiff gearchange...it goes away.

I have an 05 Tiger and before that a Sprint ST, they both had stiff gearchange frpm new but it loosened up after a couple of thou.

Paul
 

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I'll back that one up... My gearbox was clunky as hell for first few thousand miles. Got better and better and by 12,000 mile service was much quieter. Have now covered 20,000 and the gearbox is the best it's ever been
 
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