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Another thing I noticed on my bike is, that sometimes what seems like a "proper" ISCV adjustment procedure, which gives all the values as it should, could end up causing some kind of trouble..which then disappear after another ISCV adjustmen procedure (done in the same way as the first one) . This hypothesis can either be really true, or my findings were just random coincidences - I am not sure.

Another thing I noticed - there is this mandatory 0,5mm gap on the stepper arm, during the ISCV adjustment procedure, which I as a part of trial and error tried to triple, to make it 1,5mm....and still, the ECU seemed like it compensaded for that huge slack, repositioning the throttle bodies in a way that my starts and idle was exactly the same as if the gap was only 0,5mm. which is very weird.

EDIT: Third thing:
on your last photo surya, if unfiltered air could enter the airbox via that gap (if there is any gap). then it also means that your filtered air could leave that way? Even if there probably should be som suction where the engine is actually sucking the air into the engine, this probably would not make too much sense. (again, just brainstorming here). I would definitely wrap the throttle body sleeves with some silicone, it wont harm anything if this is not the cause)
 

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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
Thanks for the ideas @Perfecto. Don't own DealerTool but I did consider the ISCV opening the throttle too wide. Which could implicate the TPS and/or the air temp sensor since those tell the ECU to drive the stepper arm. Having watched the ISCV go through the test maxing out at 0.75v I don't actually believe the stepper arm can push the throttle open enough to idle at 2.5kRPM, but I'm not 100% sure. It's worth checking out with a combination of visually watching the ISCV extend its arm and corelating to TPS voltage and throttle open % in TuneECU. I will say my high idle issue shows up when the motor warms up, which is when the ISCV stepper arm is retracted. Also the issue is intermittent and sometimes blipping the throttle settles the idle back to normal - these seem to point to a physical issue rather than digital.

Comparing the TPS voltage at idle across bikes will likely not work. The ISCV extends its arm to try and keep idle speed uniform across the range of ambient temperatures and pressures. Unless our bikes see the same air temp and pressure the ISCV will open our throttles to different % values. This is related to why your experiment with setting the 1.5mm gap on the stepper arm did not change idle speed. The 0.5mm gap is simply a visible, measurable starting gap to ensure the throttle close isn't resting on the stepper arm. It doesn't affect how the ISCV stepper arm reacts. That is driven by the TPS and temp sensor, until the idle RPM gets to what the ECU thinks is correct for a particular engine temp and air pressure. Setting the gap at 1.5mm means the ISCV's compensation range is narrower, so for instance if it was very cold it won't be able to push the throttle open enough to idle correctly. Conversely if you set the gap too narrow you are increasing the range the stepper arm can operate, past the point that the ECU will actually drive it, so it wouldn't change idle speed. So the ISCV stepper arm's length or gap are not being measured by the ECU, instead the resultant idle RPM is what drives the arm in or out. This is why the throttle position % varies so much when the throttle is "closed." In fact a closed throttle is always slightly open of course, or the motor would stall. The degree to which it is cracked open by the ISCV is determined by the temperature and pressure sensors. Documented the adjustment steps on your no-start thread.

My logic is - you either can have air leak, causing the engine to idle too high, or your stepper motor extends its arm too far, opening the throttle bodies too much, causing the same issue.

Another thing we could do is to compare all the TuneECU values with each other, if we spot anything unusuall. (this would help me aswell, since I am not sure which sensors shoudl give what voltages as "normal" values)
Think your logic is sound. Measuring ISCV action and reported throttle position/TPS voltage when the high idle kicks in should clarify if the issue is an air leak or the ECU pushing the idle high. Unfortunately doing anything to speedy while it is running is difficult for my parking setup in NYC, so it'll take me a few days. I'll try to take screenshots of other TuneECU values.
 

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@surya I see your point. Thanks for the clarification on what the 0,5mm gap is for. It finally understand that "compensation" part correctly now.

Regarding your parking setup - you could try installing the smartphone version of TuneECU + a Bluetooth OBDII reader and do this diagnosis "on the fly" anywhere outside without a need to carry a laptop. My bike's mad behaviour led me to always carrying a bluetooth OBDII interface under my seat. Plus I have my phone always with me. So if I needed to, I can just plug the bluetooth scanner, turn on the TuneECU on android and can do diagnostis on the road.

I use OBDLink LX and it works like a charm. As decosse pointed out to me, this is however probably an overkill, and you should be fine also with a much cheaper alternative for this simple diagnostic. Not sure what product that would be then. I am rather on the safe side with an "overkill" option.
752299


I just plugged it to my bike and did some screenshots for you so you can compare.

1. Ignition ON, Engine OFF, bike cold (coolant 9°C):
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2. ENGINE ON, coolant temp 10°C:
752295


3. ENGINE ON, coolant temp 67°C:
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4. ENGINE ON, Coolant 102°C (about to turn on the cooling fan)
At this point I picked some other sensor values from the list of available sensors (there are many, but you can fit only 16 of them on your screen at once), so below are some more sensor values on the bike with engine ON and coolant around 100°C
752297

752298



Not sure what are the "correct" intervals for these values, and how to tell something is "way off" but right now as we speak, my bike seems to work as it should, starts cold and also hot just fine, and maintains correct idle, so I suppose these could be taken as some kind of "benchmark" for you to try to compare. (of course temperatures and barometric pressures will create some deviations, but I think they should not be too big).

The nice thing about this interface is that it will give you "target idle speed rpm" and "actual idle speed rpm" combined with Throttle opening percentage (using decimals, not just whole numbers) + also the TPS senor voltage. It is not so visible from the screenshot, but watching that in real time I am able to see how the cold bike sets 1422 rpm as target, and then uses the stepper motor to open the throttle bodies a bit more (throttle position 1,6% and TPS voltage at 0,665v) but then as the bike warms up, the throttle position goes down towards 0 and finaly settles at 0.0%. The TPS went down to 0,621v aswell as the bike warmed up. And as the coolant temperature sensor tells the ECU we are at 100°C, it also changes its "target idle speed" to 1300rpm, and manages to maintain 1310rpm which is pretty close.

I think all this is actually pretty neat, once one learns to understand all this, and when the system works as it should. Still, having a manual "choke" on my left handlebar would probably be a preferable solution to me, once I went thru all this hell 😅

Hope this will help you somehow my friend!
 

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Discussion Starter · #64 · (Edited)
Thanks @Perfecto you're right it may be time to retire laptop TuneECU. That dashboard is richer than the PC and you're right it's cool to know the target v. actuals as our ancient digital fueling system keeps up with inputs and tries to condition the output (deviation from stoich mixture). While the early 1050 small-throttle-opening running has never been silky smooth like the street triple of the same gen was, I do think mine has gotten harsher over the years. This way of looking at the ECU's dynamic response may shed some light on how far out of range sensor (MAP, TPS, O2, temp, crank) data may be. Come to think of it this is more or less how I feel compared to when I bought speedy in '06 - less flexible, more cranky, sensors crapping out (reading glasses), slower to start...but with more jokes, bigger appetite and worse temper. 😵 Looks like Alain has a very short list of confirmed-compatible Anrdoids, and an even shorter list of BT adaptors. Did you try hooking up the USB OBD2 cable to your phone with an OTG adaptor? If that works I can skip the BT shopping and try to connect with my Pixel today.

Congrats on a perfectly running speedy btw. I know you've worked long and hard, hope the ride makes it all worth it. Starting every time on the button ain't a bad gift from speedy for your efforts in the past year. Either that or we all have Stockholm syndrome. :cautious:
 

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😅 you just made me laugh. I definitely have the Stockholm syndrome now. I also made an important mental shift in my relationship with this bike, and it were (among others) also your stories here on the forum that inspired me to do this shift: I stopped to think of this bike as a reliable modern daily-driven bike where you have the expectation to come to it, start, ride, and go home. I treat it now as a veteran exotic piece. As if I had a 50 year old Jaguar E-type. This sets my expectations to another dimension. The default expectation now is, that it is probably broken and doesnt run, and I´m just not aware of it...yet :D With this, every ride which goes without a mechanical issue, and every mile driven on the road, is a small reason to celebrate. 😅

I like the emotion this bike gives you SO MUCH I am not able to sell her. I was thinking a few times to have a revenge, and sell her for parts. But nope. Can´t do. At least not yet.I also went to dealership and tried the 2020 Speed, and 2020 StreetRS. Imagined how painless my life with a new bike would be...but stil my old 1050 feels like it has a special "emotion". Not sure what it is, but I like the old school heavy mechanical feeling of the bike. And of course the low end torque and sound. As you pointed out, I fought hard to make it at least start, and seems like I finally did it a few days ago.

What I did not mention is,that I still have 2 mysterious oil leaks, where one of them probably means my engine block has a crack in it😵, and today as I was recording the TuneECU screenshots for you I noticed my radiator started to leak tiny drops of coolant 😅😅😅 And my front left fork is leaking oil heavily despite the oil seal was changed by my mechanic a year ago. But all those I consider as "details" compared to other issues which are waiting for me just around the corner with this bike 😅

Back on topic however:

I do not think you should scrap the Windows version of TuneECU. It has its purpose as it lets you to record maps/tunes into the ECU. But definitely go for the android app aswell. I honestly think the best combination is to have both.
1. Windows version of TuneECU to be able to read/load tunes if needed
2. Android version - which is not discontinued as the PC version is, and has more sensor data available
3. in addition to that, I am bought also the dealer tool to delete fault codes (but this maybe can be done in the TuneECU aswell). DealerTool definitely shows more sensor values compared to TuneECU on Windows, but I guess the Android TuneECU has most of them/all of them (never tried to compare one by one)

Another idea regarding your high idle issue:
Could some part of the secondary air injection cause this trouble? I remember I read that the part no.6, that triple vulcanised tube, is a common point of failure. Not sure if this could distrupt the idle however.
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EDIT: I never tried the OTG adaptor. I bought the Bluetooth interfece right away. And for the Windows version of tuneECU I actually use a cable I bought to run diagnostic software on my BMW e46 car. I just tried it if it works and it does so I use it.
 

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Another thing surya,

what about that "clunk" noise when turning OFF the engine. Did it go away after your battle with starter and sprag?
Mine has a very distinctive clunk noise when I turn off the engine and it has it from the moment I bought it. Standing next to the bike, it is much more louder and distinctive compared to how it sounds on video, but I never thought of it as something bad. Does your bike still do it or did it went away?

 

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You can read and upload tunes with the android version of TuneECU too, but editing them is much easier in the windows version (for me at least). Either allows you to read and clear fault codes.

I doubt an SAI leak would cause a high idle, any leak there is on the exhaust side so can't get into the combustion chamber at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #69 ·
what about that "clunk" noise when turning OFF the engine. Did it go away after your battle with starter and sprag?
Sounds normal. Think what you're hearing is the fraction of a second when the pendulum effect may send the motor backwards a couple of degrees after coming to rest, driving the sprag and starter very briefly. The clack I was hearing was qualitatively different, when the starter idler with missing teeth spun and caught on the starter pinion. All went away with the new idler.

Another idea regarding your high idle issue:
Could some part of the secondary air injection cause this trouble?
Don't think so since the SAIC injects air post combustion. I did check the SAIC when I had the airbox off yesterday, the valve works with +12v and hoses are ok.

Got TuneECU installed on my Android, found an OTG adaptor so I can try the USB-FTDI cable from the laptop with my phone.

Sounds like you have a handle on the oil leaks. The radiator leak is a pain, no easy way to fix that and aftermarket radiators appear to be a crapshoot. With luck the leak is from a loose hose clamp or bad rad cap. Re: the fork oil leak try a fork seal cleaner first, saved a few $$ last year during annual inspection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
Have some data on the high idle problem. Bought TuneECU for Android for the $11 and used my 10 yr old USB-FTDI cable with an OTG adaptor to connect to my phone. Worked the 1st time and provides 10x the sensor data available on the Windows version of TuneECU. Thanks @Perfecto for recommending.

Before start, ambient air temp 62F (15C)
Screenshot_20210418-144931.png

A minute after start
Screenshot_20210418-153116.png

15 min into the ride when the high idle happened, ambient temp still 62F
Screenshot_20210418-154928.png Screenshot_20210418-154937.png Screenshot_20210418-154945.png

You can see with a warmed up motor at 0% throttle the idle is 2600RPM with a target idle speed of 1300RPPM. This seems to rule out issues with the TPS or ISCV since the ECU appears to be getting accurate inputs and asking for the correct idle speed. (Edit: @Perfecto which sensor tells you about the steps the ISCV stepper arm is extended?) To me this says air leak. But the rest of the experience - the idle speed returns to normal about 50% of the time at stop lights, startups are very easy and quick, uniform manifold pressure numbers, smooth running with lots of power - appear to say no air leaks. While this seems like a minor issue, riding around in NYC with a 2600-3000RPM idle is surprisingly disruptive. Zero engine braking, every stop light people think you're a drag racer and shifting into 1st puts your teeth on edge. Also very gas smelly.

The only sensor readings that don't make sense are air temp and oxygen sensor trim. The air temp sensor appears to be tracking engine temp and not outside air. And (less significant to high idle) the O2 sensor appears to be doing nothing. The TPS appears to be slightly low, confirmed when I ran the adjust procedure:
Screenshot_20210418-145340.png Screenshot_20210418-145351.png
but I've seen this way more out of whack without impact on idle.
  1. Anybody confirm the air temp should read ambient?
  2. Any other sensor voltages look out of range?
  3. Other ideas on identifying source for this stubborn high idle?
Thanks.
 

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Hi @surya , good to hear you managed to connect it.

1. The official Triumph manual refers to a parameter "Intake Air Temperature" which should be measured by "Intake Air Temperature Sensor"

752764


You of course probably know,that it lives on top of the airbox:
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Weird thing is, that the official dealer lists TWO different parts, as if the bike had 2 air temperature sensors. But I believe this are just alternatives for bikes with different VIN numbers.
I think our bikes have only 1 air temperature sensor fitted, the on in the airbox. Can anybody confirm this? (Of course, in addition to that, we have barometric pressure, coolant temperature and MAP sensor, but these are different sensors with different purposes.)

752761




So to answer your first question:

As I understand it, this sensor should measrue "Intake Air Temperature" which is not necessarily the same as "ambient". Since it is located on top of airpbox below the tank, the area and the air around it will get hotter as the bike warms up. The thing is, and you can see that on my screenshots: bofore I started my bike during a cold day the air temperature sensor was showing 12°C (53°F) Air Temperature when the bike was compeltly cold, so at: 9°C (48°F) Coolant temperature.

BUT, when my bike warmed up to 102°C (215°F) Coolant Temperature, the air temperature got a bit higher; to: 15°C (59°F). I think this effect is attributed to all the parts around the bike getting hot from the bike.

The weird thing is, that while my intake air temperature sensor measurment went from 12°C (53°F) stone cold to 15°C (59°F) when bike was so hot the fan kicked in,
yours went from 17°C (62°F) to 40°C (104°F) which is a pretty huge difference.

My "hot" air intake temperature was measured after around 10 minutes of idling at standstill, so either my intake air temperature would go much higher if I actually ridden it (I can try this in the upcoming days) or your intake air sensor measures a significantly hotter temperature when the bike gets warm a bit.
Hard to say, my test with screenshots here was on a cold day without sun. If the bike was on direct sunlight I think it is possible for the area below the fuealtank to reach 40°C (104°F) with sensor beeing 100% functional.
Another thing - manual says that ECU compensates the amount of fuel based on intake temperature. I have no idea if measuring higher temperature would compensate with "more" or "less" fuel, and if it could be a compensation SO significant, that it would send your idle to 3000rpm

2) oxygen sensor compensation - these values also look quite different to mine. Unfortunately I have no idea how exactly this parameter works, hopefully somebody else does.
Would be nice to see another set of "screenshots" from a well runing speedy (if there is such a thing 😅 ) for comparison

3) those TPS values on your last screenshot are do not look good. My learning with the TPS was that what seems like "a bit" out of spec is actually "a lot". So if you consitently measure 0,562 volts in the first step of the ISCV adjustment procedure, my first step would be to rotate the TPS to precisely 0,60v and then move further.

If your ECU was thinking that your throttle is "too closed" (because TPS is reporting low amount of volts) would it extend the ISCV Arm to pusth the throttle bodies a bit more to the "open" position, which would result in idle beeing too high, wouldn't it?

Since you can now carry the diagnostic with you, I would test what voltage does the TPS report during ISCV adjustment when the bike has correct idle. Then When the high idle issue happens maybe it would be nice to stop the bike, run the ISCV procedure and compare the values?

EDIT: I used the dealertool software to display ISCV steps before, but now I see that android TuneECU includes in the list of sensors "Idle Speed Control Current Steps" and "Idle Speed Control Target Steps" so maybe turning these two on and comparing their values could reveal something. I mean, if you start the bike, let it warm, and will see "some number" as "target" and "actual" value for ISCV steps, and then measure the same when the bike will do its "high idle thing"...if the values will be significantly different then the TPS could be the culprit as it "reports" bad values suddenly...or, if the values will be more or less the same, then I would say you really have another problem or an air leak...?
 

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Discussion Starter · #72 · (Edited)
Thanks for the helpful screenshots @Perfecto. Ordered a bunch of sensors today - MAP-T1292015, TPS-T1241183, air temp-T1292004 (the one with the o-ring in your screenshot is the water temp sensor) . Planning to buy an O2 sensor-T2201347, crank-T1290291 and water temp sensor-T1290360 to eliminate all mixture-driving sensors. If I had the time I'd buy one at a time but I'd like speedy up and running for a long ride in early May.

Never seen a temp sensor fail in years of wrenching bikes and cars but there's always a first time. If the temp sensor indicated 40 degrees higher than it should per the comparison with your TuneECU numbers, then the ECU would send a much leaner mixture to burn, which could conceivably raise the idle. Same for the TPS indicating low as you pointed out, although there my experience is that TPS values up to of +/-.1v don't affect idle until it gets to very cold weather. Sounds like the MAP and air temp sensor are the most promising since they dictate mixture at idle and very low throttle openings - which is where I have my problem.

Edit: @DEcosse @RampantParanoia @DieselGeek @Ferris @Terry Colley and anyone else who may have diagnosed sensors - is there a chart with test resistance values you could point me to, for the part numbers above? Some of the sensors I've purchased on fleabay are used.
 

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The sensor resistance charts are in the service manual, you can find a free copy online very easily :)

EDIT: From memory they'll be under "Pinpoint Tests" in the fuel /engine management section. The temperature sensors will have a table of resistance values against temperature while the others will probably just have a single resistance spec. No idea on the MAP sensor, for some reason I think it's CANBUS so not much to test with a multimeter. I could have made that up though.
 

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So these are the resistance values for the intake air temperature sensor based on the manual. TPS and MAP do not seem to have resistance values included in manual.

752907

Another idea (maybe useless one), but during my troubleshooting procedure I got an advice on the speed triple forum from a guy saying this:

"I went through TPS issues. The bike would stall upon rolling and engaging clutch. I would reset the TPS and it would run fine for 50-100 miles then fail. Did this routine for about two years and finally brought it to the dealer. They swapped out the TPS and I haven’t had an issue since. In a nutshell, the TPS can slowly fail overtime. I have an 06."

Now if that can happen, then the TPS probably could fail also the same way but in another "direction", suddenly reporting wrong (too low?) volt measurments, forcing the ISCV to extend its arm too far, sending the RPMs to the sky? Keeping an eye on the "Idle Speed Control Current Steps" and "Idle Speed Control Target Steps" and "TPS volts" when the bike behaves "okay" versus when it gets crazy could probably answer that...
 

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Discussion Starter · #75 · (Edited)
Replacement sensors have not arrived but it was a sunny day in NYC and I did some more TuneECU testing including taking a look at the ISCV stepper motor action. I do think the TPS needs replacement. Aside from that the air temp sensor (after warmup) still reads up to 40 degrees higher than ambient. The O2 sensor did nothing for a while but then did start dithering between .5 and 1.2v which seems about normal with resulting -5 to -8% idle trim and an indicated O2 sensor idle range. Idle adaptation never budges from 0% even after 12 min tune.

Cold start @ 64F ambient temp
Screenshot_20210423-162239.png
Running 3 min
Screenshot_20210423-162518.png
Warm start @ 65F ambient temp
Screenshot_20210423-172457.png Screenshot_20210423-172537.png
Hot
Screenshot_20210423-172920.png Screenshot_20210423-172939.png
After rad. fan cycle
Screenshot_20210423-173200.png Screenshot_20210423-173452.png Screenshot_20210423-173609.png Screenshot_20210423-173940.png

The good news - idle speed and ISCV steps appear to match targets, so the physical stepper motor action and ECU control of it is working. O2 sensor appears to be doing something with voltage and trim changing. Open questions - I'd appreciate if somebody else can run TuneECU on an early speedy to check:
  • With a hot motor is the air temp sensor supposed to indicate close to ambient?
  • Does the "Idle Adaption" show anything other than 0%, after idling for more than 20 min without touching throttle?
  • Does your TPS "closed throttle" voltage (when you run the TPS/ISCV adjustment, first step) vary? Mine seems to move around between 0.55-0.65v, after adjusting to 0.6v.
  • Any other sensor value look out of whack? Thanks.
 

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Recognize that the air temperature it sees when you are sitting still is going to be greatly affected by engine/radiator heat vs when moving it will be much less so .

Right after I typed that I recognized that will greatly skew what is happening with a '12 minute tune' - if your intake temp is artificially higher because its sitting still.
Food for thought ....................
 

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Discussion Starter · #77 ·
Right after I typed that I recognized that will greatly skew what is happening with a '12 minute tune' - if your intake temp is artificially higher because its sitting still.
How else can the 12-min tune be run? Related, does the 12-min tune achieve the same as clicking on "reset adaptives" in TuneECU?

You're right the air intake above the rad will be warmer but we have one data point from @Perfecto that seems to indicate the air temp sensor should not spike by 40F as mine is doing. Hoping somebody else can check in TuneECU.
 

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You're right the air intake above the rad will be warmer but we have one data point from Perfecto that seems to indicate the air temp sensor should not spike by 40F as mine is doing.
Any 2005/2006 speedy owner who would measure the intake air temperature value difference to ambient temp when the bike gets warm? I would use that measurment aswell. Since my bike had it own problems not so long ago, which I am still not 100% that are fixed (maybe they just did not pop up yet, since they were random) I think there is a chance that it is actually my temp sensor measruring a temeprature which is too low. (my bike measured the intake air temperature at only 3°C higher after idling for 25 minutes, sitting still).

Does your TPS "closed throttle" voltage (when you run the TPS/ISCV adjustment, first step) vary? Mine seems to move around between 0.55-0.65v, after adjusting to 0.6v.
Mine does not. Once it did (from 0,615v to 0,630v) which forced me to physically rotate it back to 0,60v, and I believe that it was this, that actually solved my starting issues.

At this point I would bet that your TPS is toast. I might be wrong but my reasoning is this:

The first step of ISCV ajdustment is the ONLY time where you see your butterfly valves on throttle bodies fully closed. Now, "fully closed" is the only position which can not change over time. Ever. The real physical position of the throttle body shaft, should be the same, every time they are fully closed (so in the first step of ISCV adjustment). And correctly working TPS should therefore measure the same value every time there. The TPS has only 1 task - that is to determine in which position the throttle bodies are, so the ECU will know how far to extend or retract the ISCV, and what mixture to prepare for the engine. This one task can be executed only if a certain number of "volts" reported by TPS is always attributed to the same number of degrees of rotation of the throttle bodies. Once this starts to scatter up and down, the ECU is confused and the mixture and ISCV behaviour go out of the window. Now consider that the tolerance at the first step is 0,02volts ranging from 0,58 to 0,62 volts, and your ECU sometimes recieves 0,55v and other times 0,65v... if that would happen, while the bike was idling, I think this could result in either the engine shutting itself off, or raising its idle. So I think your symptoms fall within this pretty well. Another symptom could be that the bike would feel "jerky" as if you could not operate the throttle smoothly.

While I was solving my starting issues I learned that one of the ways how to determine if a TPS is faulty would be to have the engine OFF, ignition ON, TuneECU connected and try to rotate the throttle grip ON and OFF a few times (slowly, and also rapidly from 0% to 100% throttle ) while looking at the TPS volts and Trhottle opening % in TuneECU. If you will see that the value scatters (so it inserts a lower number while you are opening the throttle, so % will go like 1-2-3-4-7-5-6-7 etc.) this would mean your TPS is not working as it should and needs replacing. I did this test a few times last year and I never seen this happen. Not a single time it scattered. So maybe you can try this aswell while you are waiting for your new sensors to arrive.

This guy explains it in more detail if yomebody would be interested:

Did you order a new TPS or a used one?
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
Couple of questions about the TPS. Per bikebandit this is the same part 2005-2015 - #T1241183, with o-ring #T124057 specified.
  • My new TPS has a spring in it that makes it rest at full clockwise.
  • The only place the o-ring will fit is over the outer circular flange nesting in the t-body, and it will likely create some friction resisting adjustment of the TPS (not the actual operation).
Don't believe either the spring or the o-ring exists on my '05 TPS. Can somebody confirm these are upgrades/retrofits?


1620149543026.png 1620149580878.png 1620149608684.png
 

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Discussion Starter · #80 ·
New TPS in and the high idle appears to be resolved, at least for one tank of gas. Low speed fueling is not perfect but noticeably smoother. High speed power/fueling unchanged. The new TPS went in from the outside, without removing anything, because of the replacement allen bolts and filed down allen key I installed the last time I had the throttle body out. Had to borrow my wife's hands to get the bolt obscured by the frame threaded, but happy that the tank stayed on. The new TPS appears to be holding the 0.6v spec +/- 0.2 better than my original TPS but still varies within the specified range. Not sure what is causing this variance - either the throttle body settles at a slightly different full-close position each time I run the TuneECU ISCV adjustment procedure or the pot inside the TPS bridges a couple of tracks.

Upper old, lower new TPS
PXL_20210507_194801534.jpg PXL_20210507_194751030.jpg PXL_20210507_194732712.jpg PXL_20210507_194723954.jpg

Idling at 1300RPM on a gray NYC day.
PXL_20210508_162508012.jpg
 
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