Safety precautions on a lonely highway - Triumph Forum: Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums
Riding and Survival Skills Tips for improving your riding skills and your survival on the road.

 6Likes
  • 1 Post By JMacd62
  • 2 Post By MileHighScottie
  • 2 Post By ranger995
  • 1 Post By grant.edwards
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-02-2019, 03:40 AM Thread Starter
Minitwins
Main Motorcycle: Street Twin.
New Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Saltspring Island BC
Posts: 15
Safety precautions on a lonely highway

Hi
Not sure if this is the best place to post my questions or if I should have posted in the trip section.
I bought the bike to enjoy riding. I donít usually commute for work. I do travel distance several times a year.
The question, what precautions do you take before a longer trip, particularly if traveling on a relatively remote highway.
Many many years ago I crashed a bike North of Loch Lomond. Not badly hurt and helped by other drivers but still hour or more from emergency services back then, got a ride to the emergency room in the back of a police car.

The obvious TCLOCK. Bike is in good shape, tires brand, new and right pressure,
Heading up Island tomorrow. Itís a ways. Even in the summer it can be a very lonely road North of Campbell River. I plan to get there before dark, sunset around 2130. Wife knows my itinerary, route, and ETA. She will also be expecting to hear from me when I stop on route. Also buddy is expecting me by 2130.

Cell cover pretty spotty if any. Not much traffic, lots of wild life, Spectacular scenery, hell of a temptation to put foot down.

So just wondering. What precautions do you take if riding alone on lonely highway.
PS I post when I get there.
Mystic likes this.
JMacd62 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-02-2019, 12:30 PM
Site Supporter
Moto Grand Prix
Main Motorcycle: 2003 Sprintabusa ST
Mile High Moderator
 
MileHighScottie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Parker, CO USA
Posts: 2,789
Other Motorcycle: 2016 Speed Triple
Extra Motorcycle: 2003 Sprint ST - Sapphire
I always travel now with a Spot Gen3 personal GPS locator device if I am out of town. Plus I carry a compact yet well-stocked trauma kit, because if you get hurt out there, who cares about a bandaid. Then there's a tool roll, and flat fix kit.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
Misti Hurst and JMacd62 like this.

-- Scott

I probably need an intervention because of the bikes that keep 'following' me home. Current garage:
2001 Daytona 955i, 2 yes two, 2003 Sprint 955i STs (spouse rides one), 2016 Speed Triple, 2001 Kawasaki ZRX 1200R
MileHighScottie is offline  
post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-02-2019, 12:44 PM
Site Supporter
SuperStock
Main Motorcycle: 2017 T120 Black
Lifetime Premium
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 247
Other Motorcycle: 2012 Speedmaster
Extra Motorcycle: 2018 T120 Black (Matt)
You can use a GPS that has tracking and share your track with someone you know or several people you know. That works even if there is no phone service.

Plan your route carefully and make a list of stops. These days you can get phone numbers and addresses of gas stations before you leave. Make a list of the ones you plan to stop at and share that list with someone. If you can, text that person when you get to a stop. I number my stops on the list and just text my wife that I've reached the stop. Stick to the plan, so that people can figure out where you are if something happens.

Try not to ride in the wee hours of the night, when there will be even less traffic and it will be harder to spot deer and other animals on the road. That's probably one of your biggest dangers on a lonely highway.

Definitely have a significant tool roll and a tire repair kit. Also, bring a 1 gallon container of gasoline, in case you miscalculate or get a leak.

Honestly though, I prefer to go on rides like that with other people. That's your best protection.

Well, I hope this helps.

Ride safe.
Misti Hurst and JMacd62 like this.
ranger995 is offline  
 
post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-03-2019, 05:06 AM Thread Starter
Minitwins
Main Motorcycle: Street Twin.
New Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Saltspring Island BC
Posts: 15
Well I got here. Turned out it took a bit longer than I anticipated.
Much to my surprise they cut off motorcycles for the ferry. One other unlucky guy and I got left behind with all the cars.
Bike is still getting run in. I ended up staying on the highway rather than use the scenic coast road.
I am a bit slow. I was laying down on the tank like a crotch rocket at 100 or 110.
North of Campbell River turned out to be further than I thought took me over 3 hours. I forgot how high and cold it is.
I found I was happier at about 80 to 90 particularly when it got cold. Not much traffic, I let a few past.
It got dark and Iím not supposed to be out after dark. Spent a lot of time riding into a setting sun. I figured best to keep to a comfortable speed and get there. On two wheels, in once piece. rather than try riding faster than my abilities. So it got dark.
I updated my ETA at Campbell River. Still was optimistic. Missed it by a ways.

Couple of things I need for longer rides. Decent luggage rack. Warmer gear. Or more layers. A windshield. It had been hot in Vancouver. Even riding up to Campbell River was warm enough.
I was pretty dam cold when I got here. Fortunately it didnít rain.
I hit a lot of bugs. Some pretty big.

Well the headlight is pretty darn good. Way better than my old bikes of decades ago. Even the low beam lit the road well.
Not that I should know this cause Iím not supposed to be out after dark. When I head home I will be starting in the morning.

I never thought about a better tool kit or tire repair kit. I should have those.

Enjoyed it. Would have been much better if I had set out earlier.

Bottom line the Street Twin is tougher than I am.
JMacd62 is offline  
post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-03-2019, 03:55 PM
Grand Prix 125
Main Motorcycle: 2019 Street Scrambler
Member
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Seatlle, WA USA
Posts: 37
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by ranger995 View Post
You can use a GPS that has tracking and share your track with someone you know or several people you know. That works even if there is no phone service.
I am curious about this? Especially the last part ("That works even if there is no phone service"). GPS does use satellites, but most people think that it's your phone sending a signal to the satellite. This isn't true, it's a constellation (group) of satellites and all they do is broadcast what time they think it is (they have very accurate atomic clocks). They receive no earth bound signals (at least not from GPS devices). Your earth-side device needs to receive 4 (though preferably 5 as that gives you elevation) time signals from different satellites, and then, making some calculations that Einstein discovered, can know where you are on the planet.

So if there's a tracker working without cell/phone coverage, it must be using satellite communication (not GPS) to relay that data. Not unheard of (there are pager systems that use satellite communications and they're mostly inexpensive).

All that to really ask... Can I get a link? Because this definitely perked my interest!

- Craig

2019 Triumph Street Scrambler
CorithMalin is online now  
post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-03-2019, 04:49 PM
SuperStock
Main Motorcycle: 2017 T100
Senior Member
 
grant.edwards's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 222
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by CorithMalin View Post
I am curious about this? Especially the last part ("That works even if there is no phone service"). [...]
So if there's a tracker working without cell/phone coverage, it must be using satellite communication (not GPS) to relay that data.
Correct. There are a variety of emergency beacon schemes that can be used to notify rescuers you need help. Some just broadcast a a dumb ping on known frequencies and rescuers triangulate on the signal. Others send your GPS position to monitoring satellites that relay the "SOS" to [somewhere]. Others can be used for normal (non-emergency) comms.

Quote:
Not unheard of (there are pager systems that use satellite communications and they're mostly inexpensive).

All that to really ask... Can I get a link? Because this definitely perked my interest!
https://www.rei.com/learn/expert-adv...r-beacons.html
CorithMalin likes this.

Grant
grant.edwards is online now  
post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-03-2019, 10:10 PM
Site Supporter
SuperStock
Main Motorcycle: 2017 T120 Black
Lifetime Premium
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 247
Other Motorcycle: 2012 Speedmaster
Extra Motorcycle: 2018 T120 Black (Matt)
Quote:
Originally Posted by CorithMalin View Post

All that to really ask... Can I get a link? Because this definitely perked my interest!

- Craig
You can use the Garmin InReach system: https://explore.garmin.com/en-US/inreach/

It's only $450 to buy the device (not much more than a good GPS receiver) and you need a subscription to use the satellite service.

I'm sure other brands have similar services and devices. I mean with cell phones providing basic GPS-like functionality they had to up their game.

Also, thanks for the lesson in GPS technology.

Last edited by ranger995; 07-03-2019 at 10:15 PM.
ranger995 is offline  
post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-16-2019, 11:51 AM
K.L
Grand Prix 125
New Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 28
I always keep tire repair kit, some cash, replacement battery or a portable charger for smartphone and spare clothing.

2005 Bonneville black
K.L is offline  
post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-09-2019, 01:32 PM
Grand Prix 125
Main Motorcycle: 2011 Street Triple
New Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by K.L View Post
I always keep tire repair kit, some cash, replacement battery or a portable charger for smartphone and spare clothing.
I would also add some water and a portable air compressor or co2 tire inflator
trtc is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options
All posts must adhere to Forum Rules

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Triumph Forum: Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter your valid email address, that can receive an automated confirmation message. Otherwise, you won't be able to gain full access.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome