73 TR7RV in a 71 T120R frame restoration - Triumph Forum: Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums
Member's Restoration & Rebuild Projects Details of member's own projects.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-11-2019, 04:11 AM Thread Starter
Grand Prix 250
Main Motorcycle: 1972 T100R, or a TR7RV
Member
 
Andytheflyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Cheshire/Shropshire, UK
Posts: 78
Other Motorcycle: 1973 TR7RV, or a T100R
Extra Motorcycle: Don't tempt me....
73 TR7RV in a 71 T120R frame restoration

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam M. View Post
This front end looks like mine T150V front end - if it is I hope you didn't use original springs with blob of red paint on one end - they are much to stiff for Trident, wouldn't work at all for a twin.
Front brake will work well with Platinum Ferodo HH pads and 11 mm front master, front light is good with H4 Lucas / Wassell reflector + bulb ( 55 / 45W? or stronger ) and 3 phase alternator.
Hi Adam,

Hmmmm. Not sure (on 22nd thoughts) about my front end. The frame is definitely an original T120R though. The forks could be the original TR7RV as the sliders would have to be to take the disc caliper.. My front master cylinder is a Norton Mk3 it seems. I'll be changing that for the correct one soon. I put some unbranded pads in when I got the bike on the road, simply because I wasn't sure I could get it roadworthy - as it happens once everything settled in it works really well.

It's a 73 TR7RV in a 71 T120R frame. I bought it as a tatty non-runner from a UK importer who brings in bikes from the US and Canada (this one's from Toronto): wiring burnt out, gearbox problems, and other key minor parts missing) simply as a project with the hope of getting it on the road this year and if all went OK restoring what was necessary this winter. That plan's worked. The frame is down to the bare metal up front (Canadian winters I suspect) but it runs really well. Pulls like a train from low revs and will cruise all day, leaving an oil slick. The front mudguard is non original but it doesn't look too out of place. The centre stand is badly worn and that needs fixing (I have a tame welder). Otherwise it's leave it alone as far as possible, just powder coat the black bits, new master cylinder and engine strip and inspect - and that sludge trap, and a careful re-assemble. Needs 2 or 3 helicoils too.

I fitted a pattern front brake caliper as the original was seized, but will try to get that repaired and then I can fit the chrome cover again. I know it's not matching numbers, but it really is a joy to ride and the complete antithesis of my 72 newly-restored Daytona.

The pics are as I bought it - not as it is now! It looks much better now with some effort and a new, correct exhaust system.

I'll be posting the story over the winter.
Attached Images
   
Andytheflyer is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-11-2019, 06:09 AM
SOTP Vintage Series
Main Motorcycle: T160
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Great Britain
Posts: 6,238
Other Motorcycle: T100, T150
Lightbulb

Hi Andy,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
front end.
Disc-brake forks are essentially disc-brake forks, from the first ('73) to the last. The only differences between triples and OIF twins are:-

. Bottom yoke. Twin's doesn't have the Zener mounting tab and the stem is shorter for the shorter OIF steering head.

. Top yoke. Same in '73/'74, twins continued with it 'til '79, when they got the same as the T160's.

. Springs and dampers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
front master cylinder is a Norton Mk3 it seems. I'll be changing that for the correct one soon.
Your attached images are small so I couldn't enlarge them; however, if it really is the Notrun mounting casting, it's better than the Triumph one as it incorporates a mounting for a proper brake lamp pressure switch. Given this was made for Notrun, the pre-'79 shonky junk cobbled up for Triumph beggars belief. If you can post some pictures of just the existing master cylinder and any existing switch cluster on the right 'bar, I might be able to offer more detailed advice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
pattern front brake caliper as the original was seized, but will try to get that repaired
Mmmm ... was the pattern an ally Grimeca? If so, less unsprung weight than the original steel caliper and imho looks better - bear in mind the chrome cover is only a 'go-faster stripe' to cover the ugly steel caliper ... If the pattern one is a Grimeca, check the mounting holes - the Grimeca was 'all metric', possibly including the mounting holes being 10 mm. ID rather than the 3/8" of the studs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
unbranded pads
works really well.
If you intend changing 'em, Mini Green Stuff are cheaper and better than paying for packaging like "EBC HH", "Ferodo Platinum", blah. However, there seems to be more than one grade of Green Stuff so I can point you at a couple of suppliers of different grades that are known to work well on bikes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
front mudguard is non original
Looks like the one Harris came up with for his Bonny; if it is, it's stainless. Only problem with them and a single disc is they weren't designed for keeping the sliders parallel under hard braking. The standard '73-on "Bridge" is better, if not brilliant. @Boggie Ian reports the Hyde brace is better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
71 T120R frame.
frame is down to the bare metal
You know about checking for cracks where the swinging arm mounts to the oil tank/tube, and to have it strengthened as per later OIF?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
engine strip and inspect - and that sludge trap,
Put a Charlie's filter in the bottom of the frame tube and/or an external filter between engine and tank/tube return and you'll never be concerned about the "sludge trap" again.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
Otherwise it's leave it alone as far as possible,
I bought it as a tatty non-runner
You don't mention the brake hoses? Lockheed recommended they should be changed at no more than ten years old. However, no remaining part of "Lockheed" makes 'em. Nevertheless, I haven't used even a Lockheed hose since the early 1980's, all Goodridge braided with stainless end fittings (spendy but Kwol, hoses I made (easy to make) in the early 1980's are indistinguishable from any made even recently ). If you're changing caliper and/or master cylinder, maybe consider replacing the hoses and pipes at the same time?

Hth.

Regards,

Stuart
StuartMac is offline  
post #3 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-11-2019, 11:49 AM Thread Starter
Grand Prix 250
Main Motorcycle: 1972 T100R, or a TR7RV
Member
 
Andytheflyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Cheshire/Shropshire, UK
Posts: 78
Other Motorcycle: 1973 TR7RV, or a T100R
Extra Motorcycle: Don't tempt me....
Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartMac View Post
Hi Andy,
Your attached images are small so I couldn't enlarge them; however, if it really is the Notrun mounting casting, it's better than the Triumph one as it incorporates a mounting for a proper brake lamp pressure switch. Given this was made for Notrun, the pre-'79 shonky junk cobbled up for Triumph beggars belief. If you can post some pictures of just the existing master cylinder and any existing switch cluster on the right 'bar, I might be able to offer more detailed advice.


Mmmm ... was the pattern an ally Grimeca? If so, less unsprung weight than the original steel caliper and imho looks better - bear in mind the chrome cover is only a 'go-faster stripe' to cover the ugly steel caliper ... If the pattern one is a Grimeca, check the mounting holes - the Grimeca was 'all metric', possibly including the mounting holes being 10 mm. ID rather than the 3/8" of the studs.


If you intend changing 'em, Mini Green Stuff are cheaper and better than paying for packaging like "EBC HH", "Ferodo Platinum", blah. However, there seems to me more than one grade of Green Stuff so I can point you at a couple of suppliers of different grades that are known to work well on bikes.


Looks like the one Harris came up with for his Bonny; if it is, it's stainless. Only problem with them and a single disc is they weren't designed for keeping the sliders parallel under hard braking. The standard '73-on "Bridge" is better, if not brilliant. @Boggie Ian reports the Hyde brace is better.


You know about checking for cracks where the swinging arm mounts to the oil tank/tube, and to have it strengthened as per later OIF?


Put a Charlie's filter in the bottom of the frame tube and/or an external filter between engine and tank/tube return and you'll never be concerned about the "sludge trap" again.


You don't mention the brake hoses? Lockheed recommended they should be changed at no more than ten years old. However, no remaining part of "Lockheed" makes 'em. Nevertheless, I haven't used even a Lockheed hose since the early 1980's, all Goodridge braided with stainless end fittings (spendy but Kwol, hoses I made (easy to make) in the early 1980's are indistinguishable from any made even recently ). If you're changing caliper and/or master cylinder, maybe consider replacing the hoses and pipes at the same time?

Hth.

Regards,
Hi Stuart,

Not quite ready for the Tiger strip yet - there's still some good weather to be had! But, hey, may as well make a start on the thread.

Some photos attached to kick off with.

The bike had had some repair work done in Canada before I bought it. The thinking is that the PO had started to sort it and then either lost interest, or ran out of money, or something else. The engine has clearly been apart relatively recently, but given the 2 or 3 stripped threads around the rocker boxes, only half a job was done. The frame had a number of loose fasteners, so I think the engine was done, or part done, and the whole thing thrown together to get it to a rolling state to get into a container and off to the UK. There were a number of small parts missing, but it came with a set of rubbers and a few other bits. I was aware of this when I bought it and looked upon it as a project to see if I could get it roadworthy - and succeeded. I'd not had a bike needing work since my last Daytona back around 1981. My later Honda NTV600 hardly ever needed a spanner.

I have no idea when the frame was changed, but it looked like the whole thing had been together for some time. There's no evidence of accident damage; TOMCC suggested that the original frame may simply have suffered from corrosion given that it's spent all its life in Toronto - or maybe it suffered the cracking around the swinging arm spindle? Who knows. I wrote to the last registered owner in Toronto but have had no reply.

Got it to run fairly easily - thorough overhaul of the carb, re-set tappets, check head bolt torques, checked all fasteners, new ignition wiring, new battery and a static timing check for the Boyer, new plugs, caps etc. Was very circumspect at first as I had no idea what the state of the engine was, but took it steady, checked the condition of the oil regularly (no debris etc) and gradually gained confidence in it. Also strobed the timing soon after getting it running.

Was mightily relieved to get a '71 age-related plate for it, with the help of the TOMCC - the original Canadian title did not refer to the different frame number. I could have registered it as a 73 Tiger from the engine number - DVLA would never have known unless they had it inspected, but I wanted to be up front and explained the situation to DVLA, and they gave it a registration based on the frame number - as they always do. Even if 90% of the bike is a '73.

It's never missed a beat all summer, the oil circulates fine, the oil pressure light goes out as soon as the engine fires, and stays out for maybe 5-7 seconds after switch off.




So, to your points:

OIF frame cracks - no, news to me. I'll have a look when it's been blasted. No oil leaks in that area though. Any links for the repair?

The master cylinder' s a Norton - as I understand it, and that was the repair kit that fitted too. It was full of oily rusty water when I stripped it so I wasn't hopeful, but it cleaned up OK and has done 1000 miles this summer with no leaks and the lever is fine in use. It doesn't have any provision for the RH 'bar switch - and I have now sourced the correct Lucas console switch for that side (Stafford autojumble came up trumps for that), so I'll restore the matching pair with a new M/C and lever assembly - that's the plan.

The new caliper is a Grimeca - it works fine once I sussed out the fasteners. All new bundy and hoses too this summer. It would just be nice to put that cover back, but it does not fit over the Grimeca caliper. In the interests of originality - but given the non-matching numbers it's only worth going so far.

The front m/g is stainless, and it has an odd hole on the rear nearside - any idea why? It's in perfect condition, but again, it would be nice to go stock - but I'm aware of the bracing issue. ATM, the forks work perfectly under braking - or as perfectly as I need. The new pads took a while to bed in, but now they have they are as sharp as I need.

Charlie's filter - yes, aware of that. Much better than an external filter I think.

Given that the forks work fine, are nice and progressive and they bounce back nicely, I'll probably just drop both forks out and not disassemble them, other than an oil change. They don't leak and the outer dust cover is new. I reckon the forks had already been done and I see no need to strip them.

I will, however, strip the engine to find out what I've got, and change bearings etc as necessary, all perishables, check the sludge trap, sort the stripped threads, and have the ally bits vapour blasted. However, it uses no oil, there's no smoke, it starts easily and reliably, there's loads of compression and it pulls like a train. It's a bit clattery so maybe needs something in the primary - the adjuster was mangled when I got it. We will see. But, when I bought it, the piston tops were brand new and shiny - so I reckon the engine is basically OK.

The gearbox and change gave me a lot of trouble, but eventually got it sorted. Misplaced layshaft thrust washer and a 4 spd gear change quadrant and worn springs etc. It still has an occasional idiosyncracy in changing up 2nd to 3rd, but that's all. Otherwise it's fine. A bit stiffer than my Daytona is, but fine, smooth and not noisy.

Will also have the wheels stripped, hubs (comical at the back) polished and re-spoked - my wheelbuilder reckons that they've been apart relatively recently but there are a couple of seized nipples and loose spokes.

The centre stand is so worn that both wheels sit on the ground - the centre stand goes way too far forward. That makes it really hard to get it off the stand - and since I'm no longer 21, that's an issue. I'll get it built up with weld and ground back so that the stand stays nearer the vertical. The bolt holes are fine.

That's the plan, anyway. Keep as much originality as possible, given the T120R frame, but get everything working and respectable, and reliable fun to ride. I'm surprised at just how much fun it has been this summer, despite its tatty appearance, and those plastic side covers are plain horrible.

All comments and suggestions gratefully received.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0007.JPG
Views:	7
Size:	582.4 KB
ID:	658206   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0002.JPG
Views:	8
Size:	522.7 KB
ID:	658208   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0006.JPG
Views:	7
Size:	525.3 KB
ID:	658210   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0011.JPG
Views:	7
Size:	458.8 KB
ID:	658212   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0005.JPG
Views:	6
Size:	572.1 KB
ID:	658214  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0010.JPG
Views:	7
Size:	531.8 KB
ID:	658216   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0003.JPG
Views:	7
Size:	562.4 KB
ID:	658218   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0009.JPG
Views:	7
Size:	561.9 KB
ID:	658220   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0008.JPG
Views:	8
Size:	597.5 KB
ID:	658222  
Andytheflyer is online now  
 
post #4 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-11-2019, 06:06 PM
SOTP Vintage Series
Main Motorcycle: T160
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Great Britain
Posts: 6,238
Other Motorcycle: T100, T150
Lightbulb

Hi Andy,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
OIF frame cracks
Have a Search of the main CVV Forum, I'm sure I've read stuff there. If you don't find anything, start a thread, I have it in mind it was likely @Rancidpegwoman , @wol , @rambo or @DAVE M that've written about it? I also have it in mind that Triumph had fixed the problem by '73 and the disc brake?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
master cylinder' s a Norton - as I understand it, and that was the repair kit that fitted too.
I know the Notrun repair kit fits but 'tin't Notrun; as I say, the standard Commando castings incorporate a mounting for a pressure switch. It's a Lockheed CP2215, a so-called "racing" master cylinder, although I bought one in about 1983 to fix a shonky Honda front brake - still got it and it currently adorns my T100.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
master cylinder
doesn't have any provision for the RH 'bar switch - and I have now sourced the correct Lucas console switch for that side
so I'll restore the matching pair with a new M/C and lever assembly - that's the plan.
Ime, I really, really wouldn't ... apart from "given the non-matching numbers it's only worth going so far", the 'correct' master cylinder, mounting, blah will set you back a large amount of money, won't work any better (because the cylinder's exactly the same size) and might work worse depending on which pattern parts maker made the stainless bits. An educated guess says the "Stafford autojumble" switch cluster is either original Lucas (in which case it's at least 40 years old) or it's new Shonky Sparkx or Wassell "Genuine Lucas"? As I say, the plastic brake lamp switch is pretty horrible ...

Just as a matter of interest, what switch cluster is on the left 'bar? If it's the 'pair' of the new right-hand one you've bought, I appreciate you must be looking forward to having the missing functions. Fwiw, on my T100, I used the left-hand cluster first fitted to the T160 and then to '76-'78 twins; this has all the functions except the kill switch, I've faffed around with a couple of different right-hand clusters but, from an old main Forum thread, I'm going to fit one from a Hinckley - it only has kill switch (and electric starter) and, because Hinckleys have a master cylinder that clamps independently around the 'bar - like our "racing" master cylinders - it'll fit between twistgrip and master cylinder without moving 'em too far apart.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
All new bundy and hoses
That's a pity in one way, because I'm guessing you won't be wildly-keen on chucking most of it away to fit a brake lamp pressure switch?

Just as a matter of interest, did you find hose/bundy to fit master cylinder and caliper metric threads, or have you used standard 3/8"UNF?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
would just be nice to put that cover back, but it does not fit over the Grimeca caliper. In the interests of originality - but given the non-matching numbers it's only worth going so far.
Depends how much you want to spend rescuing the original caliper?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
front m/g is stainless, and it has an odd hole on the rear nearside - any idea why?
'Fraid not; I bought one for the aforementioned Honda, after it's original 'guard rusted but I don't recollect the 'ole.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
Charlie's filter
Much better than an external filter I think.
Fwiw, my T100 has a Tri-Cor England filter kit that uses the standard triple element.

Hth,

Regards,

Stuart
StuartMac is offline  
post #5 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-11-2019, 08:13 PM
SuperSport
Main Motorcycle: 70 BSA A65
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Mississauga
Posts: 1,274
So it looks like I have some connection to this bike leaving in a Toronto suburb.
Front fender to me looks like some Kawasaki fender with a hole for plastic brake line guide.
Adam M. is online now  
post #6 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 04:10 AM Thread Starter
Grand Prix 250
Main Motorcycle: 1972 T100R, or a TR7RV
Member
 
Andytheflyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Cheshire/Shropshire, UK
Posts: 78
Other Motorcycle: 1973 TR7RV, or a T100R
Extra Motorcycle: Don't tempt me....
Hi Stuart,

The console switch I found at Stafford is an original Lucas - used but in good nick. It was even attached to a battered m/cylinder, which I declined and got a tenner off! I want it to match the LH side one - I've got half of the repair kit still to use. Had to refurb the console switches on my T100R so got the hang of that job now.

I may or may not restore the indicators - so I have to decide how I'm going to configure the 2 switches, very probably no front brake switch. I was taught, years ago by Police motorcyclists, to apply the back brake a fraction after the front - and I always do - so I get the brake light on anyway. ATM, the LH switch operates the main/dip and horn, so a PO has reconfigured the functions. I need to have a look at the wiring and see what's what. My T100R has main/dip on the RH side and indicators on th LH switch. Will set the Tiger to the same way.

And yes - it's the Tri-Cor kit filter that I'll probably buy.

The new m/c will be from LP Williams or similar - not a part I'll be taking any risks with.

Andy
Andytheflyer is online now  
post #7 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 06:22 AM
SOTP Vintage Series
Main Motorcycle: T160
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Great Britain
Posts: 6,238
Other Motorcycle: T100, T150
Cool

Hi Andy,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
may or may not restore the indicators - so I have to decide how I'm going to configure the 2 switches,
ATM, the LH switch operates the main/dip and horn, so a PO has reconfigured the functions. I need to have a look at the wiring and see what's what. My T100R has main/dip on the RH side and indicators on th LH switch. Will set the Tiger to the same way.
Risking telling you things you know already, there are basically three different switch clusters with the short black flappy paddle lever in the middle (not counting the right-hand one fitted to T160's and '76-'78 twins, where the lever's the kill switch):-

. '71 and early '72, the 'indicators cluster' (3-position short black flappy paddle lever, Green/White, Green/Red and Light Green/Brown wires) was on the right bar and the 'dipswitch cluster' (2-position short black flappy paddle lever, Blue/White, Blue/Red and Blue wires) was on the left bar;

. the dipswitch lever used the 'down' and 'middle' positions so, when the clusters swapped 'bars from about mid-'72, a new 'dipswitch cluster' has the lever still using the 'down' and 'middle' positions on the right 'bar.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
front brake switch. I was taught, years ago by Police motorcyclists, to apply the back brake a fraction after the front
I've been out with both Met. and Kent police riders and I've done the IAM course ... but show me a police motorcycle not fitted with a front brake switch ... Certainly in the crowded south-east, even police motorcyclists sometimes have to ride feet off the 'rests, no front brake switch and there are times when (usually) a rider behind won't always appreciate the rider in front is braking.

Before I rewired/upgraded my T160's, it wasn't unusual to spend time getting the brake lamp switches to work before a ride, then be advised during the ride by other riders or drivers that the brake lamp wasn't working ... So one of the upgrades was to replace the standard switches with pressure switches; zero reliability problems in over thirty years (sez he while tapping his head ...).

Hth.

Regards,

Stuart
StuartMac is offline  
post #8 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-14-2019, 04:30 AM Thread Starter
Grand Prix 250
Main Motorcycle: 1972 T100R, or a TR7RV
Member
 
Andytheflyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Cheshire/Shropshire, UK
Posts: 78
Other Motorcycle: 1973 TR7RV, or a T100R
Extra Motorcycle: Don't tempt me....
Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartMac View Post
Hi Andy,

. '71 and early '72, the 'indicators cluster' (3-position short black flappy paddle lever, Green/White, Green/Red and Light Green/Brown wires) was on the right bar and the 'dipswitch cluster' (2-position short black flappy paddle lever, Blue/White, Blue/Red and Blue wires) was on the left bar;

. the dipswitch lever used the 'down' and 'middle' positions so, when the clusters swapped 'bars from about mid-'72, a new 'dipswitch cluster' has the lever still using the 'down' and 'middle' positions on the right 'bar.
Hi Stuart - is '71 or '72 the build or model year? My T100R was a December 71 build so a 72 model year. The most appropriate wiring diagram I found for that bike had the indicators on the LH switch, which is where I have them, so now I'm not sure which way around the switches should be. The Tiger is a 1st November 1972 build.

I'd aim to have the switches the same way around so as not to confuse myself, so I need to work out what is correct for each, and then 'normalise' accordingly.
Andytheflyer is online now  
post #9 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-14-2019, 03:43 PM
SOTP Vintage Series
Main Motorcycle: T160
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Great Britain
Posts: 6,238
Other Motorcycle: T100, T150
Cool

Hi Andy,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
'71 or '72 the build or model year?
Aiui, the Triumph convention is "model year" unless otherwise specified; certainly that's the one I use, picked up first from dealers, followed by owners' clubs' magazines and internet forums.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
My T100R was a December 71 build so a 72 model year. The most appropriate wiring diagram I found for that bike had the indicators on the LH switch,
Mmmm ... depends where you look and what you know already ... Many think a Triumph workshop manual'd be reliable ... but the switch cluster labels on the 500 manual wiring diagrams are misprinted for the "KE00001 onwards" printed beside 'em ... but they're 'correct' for mid-'72-on ...

Bear in mind the whole point of the '71-on switch clusters was the same were supplied to all British motorcycle makers - BSA/Triumph and Norton - for all their ranges, models, versions and variants. Aside, that's why one of the switch clusters has a White/Red wire - because BSA/Triumph planned to introduce the new 350 DOHC Fury/Bandit range, some versions of which would've had an electric-starter - White/Red is the colour code for the starter-button-to-relay wire.

The '71 500 and 650 parts books illustrate and list exactly the same switch clusters; however, the '71/'72 650 workshop manual shows two wiring diagrams - "up to engine number HG 30870" and "from to engine number HG 30870" - with the switch clusters correctly on different sides. Then, when you look harder at the 500 diagrams, you realise the switch cluster labels are on the 'wrong' sides relative to the other lamps ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andytheflyer View Post
now I'm not sure which way around the switches should be. The Tiger is a 1st November 1972 build.
I'd aim to have the switches the same way around so as not to confuse myself, so I need to work out what is correct for each,
Imho, they're your bikes, have what suits you. As you're essentially building your 750 as a '73 - which would've had indicator switch on the left and dipswitch on the right originally - and your T100 is set up that way already, why not stick with that? Bear in mind the switch clusters look identical so no-one looking at your T100 will know the clusters are on the 'wrong' 'bars.

Also bear in mind the 'later' dipswitch cluster - that goes on the right 'bar - is the one that Sparx patterns; the 'early' ('71-to-mid-'72) one - that goes on the left 'bar - is only available as 'original Lucas'.

Hth.

Regards,

Stuart
StuartMac is offline  
post #10 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-17-2019, 02:57 PM Thread Starter
Grand Prix 250
Main Motorcycle: 1972 T100R, or a TR7RV
Member
 
Andytheflyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Cheshire/Shropshire, UK
Posts: 78
Other Motorcycle: 1973 TR7RV, or a T100R
Extra Motorcycle: Don't tempt me....
Been out today (cool but sunny) and took the TR7RV to the restorer for them to have a listen to the engine running, in advance of me taking them the bits to fit new bearings etc, whatever they decide it needs. They had a listen with a screwdriver and other than noisy tappets, they reckoned there was a noisy gearbox bearing. Other than that, no obvious problems.

Then took it to my tame welder and put it up on the centre stand - where the wear problem was immediately apparent and Jem knew instantly what the problem was, and the fix. On the stand, both wheels are still on the ground - you can push the bike around on the stand - which is angled a long way forward. The wear is not in the pivot bolt holes, it's on the top of the stand legs where they abut the frame.

So, the principal players in the winter's restoration know what they have to do for me, in exchange for large numbers of beer tokens.

Then, back home, I had a go at Stuart's fix for the skewed handlebars:

https://www.triumphrat.net/2004011818-post57.html

Took hold of the bars and leaned on them. After initial resistance the P clamps gave a bit and hey-ho, the bars are now straight - ready to be taken apart in the next week or so. But I now understand the fix - and it's blindingly obvious. If the P clamp bolt sections are not coaxial, so that the cores to the Metalastic bushes are not co-axial, then the bars will be skewed - no matter how co-axial the fork legs are. I could have released the P clamps and un-skewed the bars that way, but I'd simply tightened the clamps up under 'no'load' conditions. If the bars are skewed, all I need to do now is to hold them straight and then tighten the P clamps. Simples. Why didn't I think of that? It's blindingly obvious.

So, now to drain the tank and put that petrol in the Daytona, then drain the oils and start the strip down. Watch this space.

I think I've had a successful year. I bought the Tiger as a very scruffy non-runner in February, to give me something productive, practical and creative to do. The year's objective was to get it running, registered and on the road. If I could achieve that, then I'd run it and find out what needed fixing. Over a thousand relatively trouble-free (but oily) miles later the answer seems to be not much, other than fixing a few knackered threads, some oil leaks, and some cosmetic issues. So, onto this winter's project.

Last edited by Andytheflyer; 10-17-2019 at 03:03 PM.
Andytheflyer is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options
All posts must adhere to Forum Rules

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Triumph Forum: Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter your valid email address, that can receive an automated confirmation message. Otherwise, you won't be able to gain full access.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome