Search for the perfect wheel chock - Triumph Forum: Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-18-2019, 02:24 PM Thread Starter
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Search for the perfect wheel chock

Hey guys,

I am looking for something very specific. The structure of my trailer runs only lengthwise along the trailer, there are no 'crossbeams' so to speak. It is also brand new and I would prefer not to drill into it.

So I have heard a lot of guys talking about wheel chocks that don't require bolting down. Which are these, and how do they work? I don't understand where they get their stability.

Help please! I need to trailer my bike 3700km in 2 weeks, and need to sort this asap.

cheers!

AC
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-18-2019, 03:05 PM
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I take it this is just a utility trailer and not a dedicated motorcycle trailer. Just a flat floor. You can do without the chock by strapping down the four corners of the bike and then using a strap across the wheel at the 6 O'clock position and around the trailer bottom to secure the wheel. You can do the rear as well. I think they may sell a strap that goes around the tire and then gets hooked to the trailer. I really don't know why you won't drill into the trailer for a chock, but you don't really need to use one.

Here's one type of no bolt chock.
https://www.discountramps.com/kafe-w...RoCd5QQAvD_BwE
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-18-2019, 04:47 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Felony View Post
I take it this is just a utility trailer and not a dedicated motorcycle trailer. Just a flat floor. You can do without the chock by strapping down the four corners of the bike and then using a strap across the wheel at the 6 O'clock position and around the trailer bottom to secure the wheel. You can do the rear as well. I think they may sell a strap that goes around the tire and then gets hooked to the trailer. I really don't know why you won't drill into the trailer for a chock, but you don't really need to use one.

Here's one type of no bolt chock.
https://www.discountramps.com/kafe-w...RoCd5QQAvD_BwE
Mainly I don't want to drill because there are no structural supports running width wise on the trailer, they all run the length and are too widely spread for a chock to be able to reach.
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-18-2019, 06:04 PM
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What is the flooring made of? The floor must be attached to the long runners, right. The floor itself is capable of supporting the wheel chock. The chock does not have to support a load, the floor does that. It's only there to keep the bike from moving forward. You could clamp a 2X4 across the floor as a stop in front of the wheel and have the same affect. I really don't see the issue here. But, it's your trailer and your bike so do what you think is best.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-18-2019, 09:19 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Felony View Post
What is the flooring made of? The floor must be attached to the long runners, right. The floor itself is capable of supporting the wheel chock. The chock does not have to support a load, the floor does that. It's only there to keep the bike from moving forward. You could clamp a 2X4 across the floor as a stop in front of the wheel and have the same affect. I really don't see the issue here. But, it's your trailer and your bike so do what you think is best.
It's a metal floor. I guess I was thinking that the chock also keeps the wheel stable, and as such it should be attached to something structural... I'm very new to this that's all
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-19-2019, 08:27 AM
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I've transported bikes many times in pickups without a chock. I just had the front tire up against the front of the bed. Your trailer is similar. If you want to use a chock and don't want to drill into the bed, then pickup a piece of plywood, 3/4"(19mm), cut to the same size of your trailer floor and recess the bolt heads from the underside of the ply and attach the chock to the ply. If you mount the straps correctly at the 4 corners of the bike and have them orientated so they are pulling forward, you should not have an issue. Another consideration when driving a long distance is to stop periodically to check the straps' tension. They can loosen just from the movement of the bike's suspension. Don't compress the front forks more than 1/3 of the travel. You do want them compressed to keep the forks from bouncing around but not too much to damage a fork seal.

You should patent that tennis ball trick.

If you lined the trailer with ply, you could make your own chock by nailing down two 2x4, one on either side of the front tire once the bike is settled. That would keep the front wheel from being able to rotate. Push the bike to the front with the tire up against the front wall.

Last edited by Felony; 07-19-2019 at 08:34 AM.
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-21-2019, 07:37 AM Thread Starter
Grand Prix 125
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Felony View Post
I've transported bikes many times in pickups without a chock. I just had the front tire up against the front of the bed. Your trailer is similar. If you want to use a chock and don't want to drill into the bed, then pickup a piece of plywood, 3/4"(19mm), cut to the same size of your trailer floor and recess the bolt heads from the underside of the ply and attach the chock to the ply. If you mount the straps correctly at the 4 corners of the bike and have them orientated so they are pulling forward, you should not have an issue. Another consideration when driving a long distance is to stop periodically to check the straps' tension. They can loosen just from the movement of the bike's suspension. Don't compress the front forks more than 1/3 of the travel. You do want them compressed to keep the forks from bouncing around but not too much to damage a fork seal.

You should patent that tennis ball trick.

If you lined the trailer with ply, you could make your own chock by nailing down two 2x4, one on either side of the front tire once the bike is settled. That would keep the front wheel from being able to rotate. Push the bike to the front with the tire up against the front wall.
All great advice! We ended up building one and making it the width of the trailer so it can't move.

The width pieces are slightly less than the width of the trailer so it can be put in place, then add another small length of 2x4 to complete the width and a another piece as a clear on top to join them.

What did you mean by tennis ball?

Edit: ah in my garage! Haha well it makes it easier to maximize space. I hang them so that they are just touch the windshield when the car is juuust inside the garage so much workshop area doesn't get crowded 🙂
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Last edited by AirCanuck; 07-21-2019 at 07:42 AM.
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-21-2019, 08:17 AM
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Excellent. Did you test the clearance of the chock with the actual bike, tire inflated? Hard to tell from the pic. Where there's a will there's a way.
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-21-2019, 02:55 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Felony View Post
Excellent. Did you test the clearance of the chock with the actual bike, tire inflated? Hard to tell from the pic. Where there's a will there's a way.
No... All I had to work with was the tire.. we gave it extra room by 1/8" either side and extra front to back... Why will it be wider?

It's 4 7/8" gap
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-21-2019, 03:52 PM
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Probably not. 1/4" total space should be fine. Good luck with the trailer.
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