Spanners for T140 Bonneville Special 1979 - Triumph Forum: Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums
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post #1 of 28 (permalink) Old 08-22-2019, 12:24 PM Thread Starter
Minitwins
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Spanners for T140 Bonneville Special 1979

Hi,

It seems I have to do some work on the upper end of the engine during the coming winter. I have an oil leak at the front base, and also a small leak at the head gasket.

Could someone please specify the spanners needed for the cylinder base nuts and the top bolts? For the hex nuts at the base I have the correct spanner, but for the torx(?) nuts I do not have spanners that fit.

The clearances between the base nuts and cylinder block are very small, so maybe there is some specially made tools I can buy somewhere?

Any hints or help are very welcome.

Helge Walle
Norway.
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post #2 of 28 (permalink) Old 08-22-2019, 12:50 PM
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I just used a standard 12 point 1/2 inch box wrench to nip up the base nuts on my Daytona
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post #3 of 28 (permalink) Old 08-22-2019, 01:05 PM
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A standard a-f "American" set is fine
Americans often use "whitworth " to describe any British nut but actually whitworth is a screw thread and few if any threads are whitworth

What will be useful is a cylinder base nut spanner

https://www.feked.com/triumph-cylind...-x-1-2-af.html

But some grinding will make a normal one fit

Plus a head tool
https://www.feked.com/stainless-stee...l-triumph.html

You can get by with taking an inch or so off a standard L shaped hex key to use as an adaptor - or find a bolt that will fit the socket head, add some nuts to it to create a hexagonal slug

If you do remove the head then look at the washers on the head. Replace them with the larger ones used elsewhere on the head, a decent supplier should provide those washers when you order the smaller ones by part number. Examine the seat of the washer and dress any crush damage. The original was too small and recessed into the cylinder head.

Buy new pushrod seals - I always buy more than I need because postage for one set or ten is about the same.
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post #4 of 28 (permalink) Old 08-22-2019, 04:28 PM Thread Starter
Minitwins
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This was exactly the information I needed.

Thanks for the help!
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post #5 of 28 (permalink) Old 08-22-2019, 06:04 PM
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If you are doing the base gasket, change the O rings on the tappet blocks which requires removing the blocks from the barrels. You will need the two pronged tool that is hit with a hammer. Do not try and remove the blocks without one or it might shatter.
Base nuts, use a half inch AF ring spanner and grind it around the edge until it will sit over the nuts. A top quality spanner needed as it will have thin sides after grinding. I use Britool or Bedford. Gedore,Gordon, King Dick,Williams makes will also suit.

Now,where did that bit fall off ?
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post #6 of 28 (permalink) Old 08-22-2019, 06:48 PM
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Interesring read!

I have the same job on my winter list, under the heading "Make Engine Oil Tight". E.G. Leaks from the cylinder base and rear pushrod tube.

I have a set of thin-walled cranked ring spanners that will undo the base nuts but how do you torque them down again afterwards? I cannot see a socket and torque wrench getting access, even with a UJ.

Cheers,
Ian
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post #7 of 28 (permalink) Old 08-22-2019, 11:24 PM
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https://www.norbar.com/en-gb/Home/To...ion-Calculator

Assuming you have a torque wrench, the above pic shows the use of an extension spanner that fits the nuts.

Admittedly it only shows a perfect situation where the bits fit in a precisely straight line. This is not important.

What is important to know the radius from force applied (on the handle)in a straight line to the bolt, and the corresponding distance from the same point on the handle to the torque wrench centre. All that is important ia relative radii, as long as the connection isn't bent beyond 30 deg.

As you have a spanner for the nuts, presumably it has an opening at the other end. Some nuts and a bolt can fit that, which can fit a socket into a torque wrench maybe? Just throwing thoughts out.

I'm sure there's a way.
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post #8 of 28 (permalink) Old 08-23-2019, 02:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boggie View Post
I have a set of thin-walled cranked ring spanners that will undo the base nuts but how do you torque them down again afterwards? I cannot see a socket and torque wrench getting access, even with a UJ.
I've been wondering about this too. You could possibly practice on other similarly sized nuts on the bike with the torque wrench and get a feel for how far you'd have to tighten the same nut with the thin walled spanner to achieve the correct torque? Then transfer it to the base nuts, it would be approximate but you'd be able to achieve even tightening.

Or something like this if you can find the imperial size.

https://www.dirtbikexpress.co.uk/pro...panner_adapter
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post #9 of 28 (permalink) Old 08-23-2019, 03:27 AM
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Hi,

There are numerous similar tools, more usually single-ended, right up to Snap-On in price.

However, they're all solutions in search of a problem.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisACross View Post
https://www.norbar.com/en-gb/Home/To...ion-Calculator
Assuming you have a torque wrench, the above pic shows the use of an extension spanner that fits the nuts.
As you have a spanner for the nuts, presumably it has an opening at the other end. Some nuts and a bolt can fit that, which can fit a socket into a torque wrench
it only shows a perfect situation where the bits fit in a precisely straight line. This is not important.
Yes and no. Actually you torque with the torque wrench at 90 degrees to the "extension", then there isn't actually any extension to the leverage. Or slightly less than 90 degrees if you want to be really precise ... assuming you've had your torque wrench calibrated ...

Or there are some who measure the centre-to-centre distance of the double-ended ring spanner and use a spring balance hooked in the other end and pulled to the calculated weight/force.

This:-

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty1 View Post
You could possibly practice on other similarly sized nuts on the bike with the torque wrench and get a feel for how far you'd have to tighten the same nut with the thin walled spanner to achieve the correct torque?


Hth.

Regards,

Stuart
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post #10 of 28 (permalink) Old 08-23-2019, 04:24 AM
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I have rebuilt a number of engines over the years and always go by the book, wherever possible. I like the idea of the extensions and that torque calculator is great too, thanks both!

I fear that the previous builder tightened the nuts by feel and this is why it leaks and I found some of the nuts had worked loose. I can't blame the PO though, he was one of the throw money at it brigade, and paid a renown tuning company to build the engine. I prefer to do these things myself, so I know it is done right. 🙂
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