Still positive and looking ahead - Triumph Forum: Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums
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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-26-2018, 12:33 PM Thread Starter
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Main Motorcycle: 1972 T100R Daytona
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Still positive and looking ahead

When I do eventually get this bike back together what sort of riding experience can I expect? Iíve always wanted a T100 but Iíve never ridden one, the OIF A65T I once had was torquey but vibration limited cruising speed to about 65mph and accelerating hard through the gears wasnít very pleasant. I did once see 100mph on the speedometer but it was an experience too uncomfortable to ever be repeated. How different will the Daytona be?
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-26-2018, 04:24 PM
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OCR has a rather nippy Daytona. A standard road bike is a much smoother ride than the larger twins. Yes,it will be slower and acceleration will also be slower but they are still a very capable bike for longish distance with less fatigue from all the vibration. A few in our club get hammered along and do keep up very well. You will like it.

Now,where did that bit fall off ?
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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-27-2018, 09:06 AM
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Rusty -

I have a T100C instead of the R and it is absolutely a HOOT to ride! Love it in every riding setting except for interstate/70 mph. It is so light and nimble you can just throw it around easily - comfortable, great ride, not one thing to complain about. Did a top end rebuild a few years ago so she's quite zippy too but you gotta keep the revs up. And SO SIMPLE.

As yours has the dual carbs, it will be a bit harder to tune, but plenty of sites that can tell you how to do that.

While she is happy all day at 70 mph, she's geared quite a bit lower than the T120's and will be humming RPM-wise, but she doesn't complain. Not a touring bike, too light & wound tight on the highway, but I'd still be happy on mine for an all-day ride.

Plan on passing mine on to my kids.......

GN

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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-27-2018, 09:12 AM
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There is always some consideration for RIDER WEIGHT.

A rider at 145# will have a better experience than a rider at 185# (on a T100)

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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-27-2018, 07:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GrandPaulZ View Post
There is always some consideration for RIDER WEIGHT.

A rider at 145# will have a better experience than a rider at 185# (on a T100)
Paul - I'd move that number up to 200 lbs. Hate to confess it, but I've put on 20lbs. in the last 2 years due to not being able to work out like I've done most of my life & too much eating out - and I am now at a horrible 185. But the ride and handling on the T100 were not at all noticeably different to me. She handles my excess weight quite well. Never bottoms out. Ride at either weight is very soft & comfy.......

And the original owner who loved the bike and rode it all over Europe after buying it in Denmark was a good 200lbs. and 6'3" then.

GN

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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-28-2018, 09:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gatornapper View Post
... I am now at a horrible 185. But the ride and handling on the T100 were not at all noticeably different to me...
When you are used to a bike, especially one of your favorites, you don't notice the difference, and don't care!

Weight differences (rider and/or gear/accessories) ALWAYS make a difference. ESPECIALLY a difference over 10-15#. The laws of physics can't be broken.

Take your favorite bike out for a 20-minute loop. Now, strap a 20# sack of sand to the pillion seat and try that same loop. Braking distances are longer, acceleration is slower, handling is more sluggish, and top speed will be noticeably slower and harder to reach.

When you gain weight over time, you never notice the difference, you just acclimate to it.

ALL THAT SAID, the T100s are indeed very fun bikes, and far more capable than a brand new Royal Enfield Bullet! (but don't even think of comparing them to a modern 500cc DOHC with triple discs)

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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-28-2018, 10:01 AM
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Hi Rusty,
You have to try very hard not to like a Truimph 500 and you have to be exceptionally miserable to be able to ride it without a grin on your face.
As for the A65 to replace the pretty A10, I do not know how they managed to build in that level of vibration with such a late engine design (for British bikes), at least Norton had the excuse of overstretching and existing engine with the Atlas.

You will not get that excessive vibration with the Datona.

Real men use kickstarters!
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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-28-2018, 02:03 PM
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It's simple, they built a shorter stroke engine with higher compression.
I fought vibration on my own A65 with heavy handlebar weights and got quite successful, but different brackets on the bike felt it much stronger than my body and kept braking.
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-28-2018, 07:25 PM
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if you weigh more, add horsepower.

my LSR goes 135 mph, and i weighed 200 pounds when it did it.

i be kevin
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 05-07-2019, 03:47 AM Thread Starter
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Just thought Iíd update this thread as Iíve had the bike for 5 months now and though a lot of that has been garage time over the winter I was surprised to see that Iíve covered nearly 800 miles in the saddle. These were mostly short journeys to begin with, usually to test a fix, but they got longer as I grew more confident in its reliability. Itís a standard spec bike with the only deviations being Boyer EI, Tympanium rectifier/regulator, aftermarket fuel taps and Amal Premier carbs.

Overall the riding experience is very good, the bike is capable of keeping up with (and overtaking) modern day traffic and could be used as a daily rider provided you stay away from motorways. At 4000 rpm the engine is very smooth and speed is about 50-55 mph. On the few occasions I have tried motorways itís proved willing and capable of maintaining 75íish mph but at that speed wind noise, a tingle through the Ďbars, exhaust noise and the ergonomics make it an uncomfortable experience..and I do wear ear plugs. 60 mph would be fine but then Iíd be jousting with the trucks.

Ergonomics were a surprise. At first the high, forward pegs and high bars make for relaxed cruising but as time goes on you realise that all of you weight is on your backside. This does become a literal pain after about an hour and my hips certainly let me know when I get off the bike.

The controls are better than I thought theyíd be. The clutch doesnít slip or drag now though it can grab when cold, this goes away once thereís some heat in it and after that itís light and predictable. The front brake is good, has plenty of feel and will lock the wheel at low speed if I grab a handful, at higher speed it just does the job well, I canít fault it. The rear brake is less good needing a firm press for serious slowing down, it does work but thereís no feel to it so Iíll be trying new shoes. Throttle response is still WIP. Iíve done a lot of trial and error work on the new Premier carbs without posting questions on the forum and I believe Iím nearly there, Iíll update the Premier thread when Iím sure Iíve sorted it. One thing Iíve learnt during carb work is that a quick start up and rev in the garage will often make you think youíve solved the problem only for it to re-appear out on the road when everythingís fully up to temperature. Change one thing at a time and then go for a good ride.

Speaking of temperature it doesnít like sitting in a queue of traffic for 10 minutes on a hot day idling. The engine got very hot so I switched off thinking that it would be a one kick start when the lights went green. No chance, it wouldnít start until I tickled the carbs at the side of the road. Very embarrassing and lesson learned.

The inadequacies of the charging/lighting system I know about and chose to stay with the standard setup when I replaced the stator. This was the first job I undertook days after picking up the bike and at the time I wasnít confident enough to do anything but replace like for like. For my daytime riding with the pilot light on the system is fine keeping the battery above 13v easily, Iíll try a few rides with the headlight on to see how it copes, this job is still in the ĎInboxí.

The suspension is pretty taught with the rear shock springs in particular being on the firm side of firm even on the softest setting. I weigh 15 stone so it has a lot to cope with but even so on rough road surfaces it can be a jarring ride. The plus side to this is the way the bike handles on good surfaces. A new rear tyre and aligning the wheels correctly improved matters greatly and I feel much more confident on this bike than I ever did on my previous two (Kawasaki W800 and RE Bullet EFI).

Oils leaks, a subject in itself. Early ownership showed everything to be dry except the primary cover joint. That was fixed but as I started to explore the upper limits of the rev range (it really does fly above 7000 rpm) weeps developed from the front rocker box and the bottom of the rear push rod tube or possibly the base gasket, not sure yet. At the moment Iím riding and enjoying the bike so donít want to pull it apart but I know this canít continue long term.

So would I have bought the same bike given the above experiences? Yes absolutely is the answer. Iíve always liked the Daytona of this year and this bike ticked all the boxes, truth be known I was expecting just to buy and ride but I know now that was unrealistic. Whether I can get used to the frantic nature of going fastíish remains to be seen, it can be tiring and sometimes I think an extra 150cc would be nice but then the cost shoots up significantly.

Most importantly I look forward to riding it more than most bikes Iíve owned. The W800 was a good efficient machine but once the novelty of new ownership had worn off it wasnít a very exciting bike to ride.
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