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post #1 of 24 (permalink) Old 11-21-2018, 05:31 AM Thread Starter
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Rear chain adjustment

Hello everybody

I'm through with my electrical gremlins and bike runs great again.

Now I have to address another issue:

Rear chain is now getting closer to being unadjustable.

Draw bolts need to be fully turned in to take up the chain slack.

Bike has 16.000 miles on the clock, maybe it's time for a rear chain replacement, what do you think ?

What is rear chain service life in miles under normal use ?

Shall I also replace the wheel sprocket with the chain or not necessarily if condition seems to be OK ?

What about the gearbox sprocket ?

Another option could be to shorten the chain as per Workshop manual.

Has anyone of you ever tried this solution with good result and does it make sense ?

As far as replacement is concerned, I have 2 options for P/N 60.2118 REAR CHAIN 107L 5/8" x 3/8":

RENOLD or REGINA ? Any preference ?

Thanks for your feed back.

Vertical twins OHV or DOHC, I like them anyway
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post #2 of 24 (permalink) Old 11-21-2018, 06:48 AM
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Frederic -

Hard to define 'normal' because it depends so much upon riding conditions (I've seen the gravel and the damage done) and quality of maintenance.

To check your chain stretch:
Place chain on a flat surface and line links up in a straight line with a straight edge. With the links compressed together there should be 12 1/2" between pivot holes twenty links apart. With the links stretched out there should be a maximum of 12 3/4" between the holes. So 1/4" stretch over 20 links, max. (www.hermit.cc/tmc/om/manual.htm#ch_chk)

Inspect your sprockets for hooking and wear () - compare to new ones if possible. If sprockets are badly worn it's best to change them or they'll just cause premature wear on a new chain.

Here's a low quality, soft gearbox sprocket that begain hooking after very low mileage:



Here's the gearbox sprocket that I wore out in 5 or 6 thousand miles the summer I decided that cleaning the chain every 500 miles while riding almost exclusively on gravel roads was just too much trouble.

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www.hermit.cc/tmc
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post #3 of 24 (permalink) Old 11-21-2018, 07:53 AM Thread Starter
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Hi Bruce

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermit47 View Post

Here's a low quality, soft gearbox sprocket that begain hooking after very low mileage:



Here's the gearbox sprocket that I wore out in 5 or 6 thousand miles the summer I decided that cleaning the chain every 500 miles while riding almost exclusively on gravel roads was just too much trouble.

Yes they are worth a replacement

Vertical twins OHV or DOHC, I like them anyway
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post #4 of 24 (permalink) Old 11-21-2018, 08:20 AM
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Obviously itís quite a pain to replace the front sprocket. Most people donít go to the effort unless they really have to. If you find that itís time you may also consider a ratio change if it would benefit you.
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post #5 of 24 (permalink) Old 11-21-2018, 01:03 PM
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Also be aware that changing the gearbox sprocket for a larger one may mean either pulling the mainshaft or grinding some of the clutch access doorway away. Plus needing the correct sized socket for the mainshaft nut
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post #6 of 24 (permalink) Old 11-21-2018, 02:19 PM Thread Starter
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Won't be changing gearbox sprocket unless necessary.
Don't think changing gearbox ratio either.
Thanks for your advices but will mainly concentrate on the drive chain for the moment.

Vertical twins OHV or DOHC, I like them anyway
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post #7 of 24 (permalink) Old 11-21-2018, 05:41 PM
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What I did for years was to buy a new inexpensive chain every year or two, depending on the miles I rode on my '70 Tiger. I learned this from an old rider who believed that a new chain was the best way to preserve the sprockets. I know that a bad chain will wear the sprockets and bad sprockets will kill a chain. The bike was bought from me by a good friend who's still riding it on the original sprockets, and they don't look bad. The bike has about 40,000 miles on it, as I rode it very little over the last few years that I owned it.

Just the $.02 worth from the "village idiot": Jim

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post #8 of 24 (permalink) Old 11-22-2018, 03:12 AM
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Best maintenance for the new chain is to spray grease it after each ride. The grease seeps into a warm chain a lot better than a cold one. It is then ready to ride without checking next outing. I spray sparingly on short stretches as it all gets around the chain once running. No need to spray every link. Good quality non fling grease and the chain will last a long time. I am using a motocross type grease at the moment but there are many makes out there. Most of the wear on chains is at the edges of the rollers often caused by misalignment. I change chains at around 12,000 miles and my engine and rear sprocket show little wear with good lubrication.

Now,where did that bit fall off ?
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post #9 of 24 (permalink) Old 11-22-2018, 04:40 AM Thread Starter
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Hi Rambo

Thanks for your advice.
My bike is totalling 16 k miles now, so I think it's time for a replacement.
I do grease my chain with quality chain lube every once in a while, not after each ride like you suggest (I don't like greasy rim).

Vertical twins OHV or DOHC, I like them anyway
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post #10 of 24 (permalink) Old 11-22-2018, 07:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermit47 View Post
Frederic -



Here's the gearbox sprocket that I wore out in 5 or 6 thousand miles the summer I decided that cleaning the chain every 500 miles while riding almost exclusively on gravel roads was just too much trouble.

This looks like the sprockets when I had done with them in my youth where I lacked the ability to change my own, and lacked the money to pay someone else to do it. Not these days though. RR

You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life. (W S Churchill)
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