progressive fork springs t100 - Triumph Forum: Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-09-2017, 02:03 PM Thread Starter
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progressive fork springs t100

Thinking of going with new fork springs. Any thoughts on it?
Worth it how hard to do etc.
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-09-2017, 02:21 PM
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Provided you have the tools and basic mechanical aptitude to do it, it's not hard at all. Pull the OEM spring, measure the difference in length between the two springs (Progressive vs OEM), cut the spacer accordingly (Progressive I believe provide PVC tube as spacer) and reinstall in reverse order. So at the end of the day, the Progressive spring + spacer will = the same total length of the OEM spring and spacer that you pulled out.

One tip, I found it easier to cut the spacer using a tube cuter rather than a saw, this provided a nice squared off edge for mating the spacer with washer.

Order in which to reinstall: Spring>washer>spacer>fork cap.

Here's a video to illustrate it:


Chris / RudeBoy BIR #309
Past rides:2014 Scrambler, 2008 T100, 1975 Honda CB400/4, 1989 Honda GB500, 1965 Honda CB450 Black Bomber, 1972 BSA A75 Rocket3

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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-09-2017, 03:45 PM
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Before spending your money read black tiger fork mod and give it a try .

Basically its lighter oil, 7.5 wt, air gap to Thruxton spec. Cant remember what that was of hand.

I did that and also let the forks through the top triple clamp by 10mm. It has made a huge difference and I'm quite happy with the handling now. And I saved some money. Bonus !!

2006 Bonneville T100. Arrows 2-2. Airbox Baffle removed. K+N filter. TTP Bellmouth. TTP BlueFlame coils. TTP jetting kit. Crank case breather moved. 120 mains. 40 pilots. 3 Turns idle jet.
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-09-2017, 04:08 PM
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Check with racetech first.
They convinced me to use straight wound front springs springs 30% stiffer than stock.
I weigh 144 pounds and they were right.
Big improvement
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-09-2017, 05:40 PM
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"Any thoughts on it?"

Stay as far away from progressive wound springs as possible. It is probably time to service your forks. Do this or have it done and put in new springs for your weight. I like the RaceTech cartridge emulators I have in my '08 T-100 forks.

Larry
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-09-2017, 08:37 PM
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Well, I fitted Ikon progressives in the front and so far am happy with them, they made a huge difference to rider comfort on what passes for roads here! Mind you, I don't ride hard or push it through twisty stuff so that could be why they're ok for me. As to replacing them, I removed the cap on top of the fork, pulled out the spacer, fished out the spring with a piece of wire (and let the oil drain back in), dropped in the replacement spring, topped up the oil (very small amount) and replaced the cap. No need for spacers, a perfect fit.
I was appalled when I removed the original to see that the spring only filled about 2/3 of the fork tube.
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-10-2017, 06:42 AM
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Put me firmly in the camp that says YES to progressively-wound fork springs on a road ridden MC. Single linear-rate springs might be the ideal set-up on a smooth race track, but on public roads, its quite a different story. A -proper- progressively wound multi-rate set of fork springs (IMHO based on 15+ years of selling these things) will give you more comfort, especially when the roads are not ideal.

My fork springs of choice are the Hagon Progressively-wound Fork Springs. No cutting of spacers needed... just swap the parts and go.

/M

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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-10-2017, 09:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RaceDweeb View Post
Put me firmly in the camp that says YES to progressively-wound fork springs on a road ridden MC. Single linear-rate springs might be the ideal set-up on a smooth race track, but on public roads, its quite a different story. A -proper- progressively wound multi-rate set of fork springs (IMHO based on 15+ years of selling these things) will give you more comfort, especially when the roads are not ideal.

My fork springs of choice are the Hagon Progressively-wound Fork Springs. No cutting of spacers needed... just swap the parts and go.

/M

"That's my opinion folks. I could be wrong." - Dennis Miller
Completely agree. If you want a light float to take out jarring ripples go progressive. If you ride smoooth tarmac at 90% more than 50% of the time stay linear.

Pssst. Hagon Progressives look like re-badged Wilbers items that retail for 15$ less this side of the pond.......they even use the same part number.....

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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-11-2017, 02:14 PM
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Put me in the camp of Ricor Intiminators with the stock springs, installed after I concluded that the progressive springs did nothing but make the front stiffer. Luckily, I had kept the stock springs.

Marty
2005 Bonneville Blue 790cc, AI removed, Staintunes RC, no snorkel, inlet enlarged, 118/40/NBZT needles/1 shim/3 turns, Ikon 7610s, Ricor Intiminators, Barnett green clutch springs, Michelin Pilot Activs, D9 gauge panel, tachometer.
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-17-2017, 08:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonnys Bonnie View Post
Before spending your money read black tiger fork mod and give it a try .

Basically its lighter oil, 7.5 wt, air gap to Thruxton spec. Cant remember what that was of hand.

I did that and also let the forks through the top triple clamp by 10mm. It has made a huge difference and I'm quite happy with the handling now. And I saved some money. Bonus !!
Has any one tried this on a Thruxton?
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