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Twins Technical Talk Technical Talk for Hinckley Triumph Twins: Bonneville, T100, Speedmaster, America, Thruxton, and Scrambler.

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Old 11-04-2011, 11:03 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Alternative gearchange, gearshift levers

From time to time someone is unlucky enough to drop the bike and damage the gearchange or shift lever. Unlike a lot of levers ours is made in 3 pieces and each one is replaceable individually. For example the rubber peg is held to the main body of the lever with a specially-shaped M8 bolt they call a "pin". This is usually not much help because even a slight drop can break the lever at the threaded portion where the pin is screwed on, rendering the lever scrap.

If you can tolerate a shorter lever, by some 15mm or so, a repair can sometimes be made by re-drilling and tapping a new M8 hole for the pin and rubber a bit further back from the original position. This is assuming it has broken at the threaded part.

Replacements are not cheap, here's a breakdown of the costs:

Pedal ..................... Part Number T2081144 Price: 89.26 ($142.94)

Rubber .................... Part Number T2080766 Price: 4.70 ($7.52)

Pin ....................... Part Number T2080696 Price: 4.96 ($7.94)

Screw gearchange M6x20......Part number T3050332 Price: 0.55 ($0.86)

This makes the total cost for the complete lever asembly: 99.47 ($159.26) +taxes.

Seems a bit steep considering the same lever has been used on all Bonnevilles, T100, Scrambler and SE's from the beginning. I think the tooling and development costs must have been recovered by now. The thing appears to be a forging although I suspect it's more likely to be a cheaper casting, it's nicely polished only on the surfaces that can be seen, a bit of value engineering there!, and incorporates the anchorage to the 11.60 mm diameter, 30-tooth splined gearchange shaft. A thoughtful feature is the extended tab on the top to avoid your boot being trapped under the bulge in the primary case.



We have had a couple of posts vaguely suggesting far cheaper or cooler alternatives. These are after-market levers sold as accessories for small Honda dirt or pit bikes. Things like the XR and CRF range, eg. CRF80, XR80, CRF100, XR100, CRF150, etc. No further details or photos were given to confirm their suitability though, so this might inhibit people from trying these alternative levers, so this is where I come in, as I was looking for some more bling for a couple of my little pit bikes, and decided to try them on my Bonnie first to confirm that they'll fit and pass on the good news.

Those after-market levers are very good value for money, most are genuinely forged or CNC-machined alloy, and also incorporate a useful feature if you're in the habit of dropping the bike, namely a hinged or pivoted peg that folds up on impact. This could save you from not only damaging the lever, but also from bending the gearchange shaft itself, far more serious, and requiring some engine dismantling, although strangely enough, the cost of the far more complex gear change shaft is just 76 ($121).

This fold-up feature could be useful, specially on Scramblers used in the dirt, where you could hit obstructions and easily break the lever.

Some are also available in bright anodised colours and can cost up to 91% less than the OEM part. There are lots of them on ebay and pit-bike after-market sites.

The total length, that's centre of shaft to centre of peg, is a tad longer that the 110mm of the standard component at 113mm. Don't think this will make much difference though. For anal types they're half the weight of the OEM item at 75grams against 150 grams.

I've tried two types on my 09 SE, and I'm happy to announce that they both fit and work perfectly:

One for the little pit bikes, the XR50, CRF50, etc at just 7.40 ($11.99), that's -91% less than standard, bought on ebay from Hong Kong. Nicely and strongly made from billet CNC-machined alloy:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/CNC-BILLET-SHIFTER-SHIFT-LEVER-HONDA-XR50-CRF50-BLACK-/260726468186?_trksid=p3286.m7&_trkparms=algo%3DLVI %26itu%3DUCI%26otn%3D2%26po%3DLVI%26ps%3D63%26clki d%3D3651946194155364929



Another for the larger CRF150 (years 07-11), lever model number GPF112. This one came from the UK, has a smoothly finished and anodised forged main part, a CNC-machined and anodised folding peg in a contrasting red colour, and costs a little more at 14.99 ($24)inc.tax, still -83% less than the standard lever though, from this ebay listing:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FORGED-GEAR-LEVER-RED-TIP-HONDA-CRF150-CRF-150-07-09-/370326037646?_trksid=p4012.m503&_trkparms=algo%3DR IC.CF%26its%3DI%26itu%3DUA%26otn%3D8%26pmod%3D2607 26468186%26ps%3D63%26clkid%3D3651977477889271536



A couple of images showing the levers fitted to the Bonnie:





As we now know for sure that some Hondas share the gearchange shaft dimensions with the Bonnies, and that some people have asked about the possibility of fitting a heel-and-toe gearchange lever for various reasons, like limited ankle joint movement because of an old injury, there's also the possibility of adapting a heel-and-toe lever from one of the small Honda Quads. These vehicles often come fitted with such a lever and alternatives are also available in the market. The chances are that they'll have the same gearchange shaft spline measurements.

I did try to help a poster with this sometime ago, but it turned out to be one of those rude and ungrateful "ride-by" posters. Don't know if he even bothered to look at my reply, consequently I could have wasted 15 minutes of my life on this thread:

http://www.triumphrat.net/the-welcom...e-shifter.html

Last edited by Forchetto; 11-04-2011 at 11:17 AM.
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Old 11-04-2011, 01:26 PM   #2 (permalink)
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I would like a slightly shorter lever. I have small feet and find that the shifter on most bikes hits me at the toes and sometimes I fail to get a good shift because of this. Do you know of any shorter ones?
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Old 11-04-2011, 02:19 PM   #3 (permalink)
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I would imagine that the 885cc Thunderbird lever would work as well, as several owners have reported fitting Honda dirt bike levers.

It's a nice solid chunk of polished alloy, with a period look. The lever costs about 51 without the pin and rubber. Oddly enough, the chrome "accessory" version is only about 31. the pin and rubber look to be identical to the twins.
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Old 11-04-2011, 02:36 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by TX1911fan View Post
I would like a slightly shorter lever. I have small feet and find that the shifter on most bikes hits me at the toes and sometimes I fail to get a good shift because of this. Do you know of any shorter ones?
The OEM lever can be re-drilled and tapped M8 a bit further back from the normal position of the peg and rubber. There's enough material there to allow this.
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Old 11-04-2011, 06:56 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Yet again another great illustrative write up regarding the Bonnie.
Thanks Forchetto. Please don't change your bike for a few years, by which time I should have built up a comprehensive library of anything and everything to do with the Bonnie
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Old 11-04-2011, 08:21 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Forchetto, Thank you for the continued help you give to us on the site. Great information, again thanks.
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Old 11-04-2011, 09:52 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Great to know what alternatives there are that fit the twins.

Too bad this kind of interchangeability is unlikely for the rear brake lever/pedal. Just guessing based on the different actuation of various rear brake set ups.



You're right, it's difficult to tell the difference between forged and cast aluminum pieces once they've been polished and machined. Sometimes forged is obvious because it's svelt and slender, so it has to either be forged or weak. Sometimes you can tell by how heavy it feels for a known part--denser forged aluminum feels heavier.

Forged parts require massive up front expediture to make the dies. Cast stuff is much cheaper. CNC goes both ways, cheap and dear. After all the Bonnies they've sold, the dies would have paid for themselves by now if Triumph had chosen forged levers (maybe they did ?).

Last edited by STW; 11-04-2011 at 09:55 PM.
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Old 11-05-2011, 12:14 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Must also chime in to say Thank You Sir. I have a separate folder in my Favorites named Forchetto, where I can easily archive and access all of your excellant and informative posts.
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Old 11-05-2011, 01:02 PM   #9 (permalink)
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The Great Forchetto comes up trumps again

T.U.D.
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Old 11-07-2011, 02:44 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Heel and Toe gear change

I can definitely inform that the Honda CT 110 'Postie Bike' heel/ toe lever fits Bonneville.
I recently had a crash and lost the ability to lift my left foot (upshift) through nerve damage, and have fitted one of these levers. Works well, I did modify the steel lever by heating and bending, grinding out a small area to allow clearence to footpeg, but relatively simple. I have never tried to post a picture to the forum, if anyone interested I would be happy to go ahead and learn! Send me a PM.



"As we now know for sure that some Hondas share the gearchange shaft dimensions with the Bonnies, and that some people have asked about the possibility of fitting a heel-and-toe gearchange lever for various reasons, like limited ankle joint movement because of an old injury, there's also the possibility of adapting a heel-and-toe lever from one of the small Honda Quads. These vehicles often come fitted with such a lever and alternatives are also available in the market. The chances are that they'll have the same gearchange shaft spline measurements."

I did try to help a poster with this sometime ago, but it turned out to be one of those rude and ungrateful "ride-by" posters. Don't know if he even bothered to look at my reply, consequently I could have wasted 15 minutes of my life on this thread:

http://www.triumphrat.net/the-welcom...e-shifter.html[/QUOTE]
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