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Twins Talk Discussion of Hinckley Triumph Twin related matters and topics. Sponsored By: Throttle Mojo

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Old 11-29-2012, 04:20 PM   #21 (permalink)
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My advice to new riders, which probably goes largely unheeded, is to get a cheap dirtbike, find a field and learn how to operate it there. When you get comfortable with the basics, speed things up and take a few falls. A lot of us old timers learned that way. Knowing how a bike feels when you're losing control is an invaluable lesson. A lesson you don't want to learn on pavement.
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Old 11-29-2012, 05:41 PM   #22 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DennisVR View Post

.. gotten following remarks:
- No ABS
- Too heavy for a beginner
- Underpowered
- Naked bikes are not a good idea for the freeway

I would like to get opinions from Bonneville riders, who can tell first hand if these remarks are valid or not.
What a load.

Look, Dennis, it's this simple:

A Bonneville will not do any one thing as well as a purpose-built bike will.

But it will do all things better than any purpose built bike.

And, just so you know, a Bonneville is purpose-built.

It's built to do everything. Go get one. You'll probably own it forever.

Best,
Hilo


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Old 11-29-2012, 06:27 PM   #23 (permalink)
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I have just swapped from owning a Triumph America to now owning a mag wheel Bonnie and this new bike is like riding a 250 in comparison! I was very surprised just how much smaller and lighter the Bonnies actually are. It's not a sports bike but has a power delivery that is perfect for my purposes.
Just do it.
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Old 11-29-2012, 06:35 PM   #24 (permalink)
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I thought I'd chime in since my experience seems relevant. My Thruxton was my first bike when I bought it in June and it's served me well. I took the safety course, which others have mentioned but really can't be over-stated.

My only problem with it is that it is quite heavy. I wasn't used to the weight and size of motorcycles and it really surprised me. It's lighter and more manageable than other bikes of its size, but it really doesn't compare with say: a cbr250. A lighter bike gives a great deal more confidence at low speeds when you're first starting.

Beyond that, I felt I had to get a flyscreen for riding at highway speeds as the buffet was... disconcerting.

My friend keeps touting his cbr's ABS, but I really haven't noticed a difference. I've lost traction in a hard brake once, but it felt manageable.

In summary: if you don't mind the weight, the bonnies are a very good starter bike.
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Old 11-29-2012, 11:17 PM   #25 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmak View Post
My advice to new riders, which probably goes largely unheeded, is to get a cheap dirtbike, find a field and learn how to operate it there. When you get comfortable with the basics, speed things up and take a few falls. A lot of us old timers learned that way. Knowing how a bike feels when you're losing control is an invaluable lesson. A lesson you don't want to learn on pavement.
IMO, rmak gets the prize for best advice to new riders (in the won't be heeded category). I wish I learned that way instead of crashing all over the place on the street as an 18 year old.
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Old 11-30-2012, 06:16 AM   #26 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steve betts View Post
Um, because his chances of killing himself go up an order of magnitude with a Street Triple as a first bike...? That's why I think, not.
The original query was regarding comments made by others which included, too heavy, underpowered and the suitability of "naked bikes" as regards travelling on the freeway.
I was merely suggesting that the Street Triple addressed some of these issues, namely, lighter, ample performance, with the option of fitting a factory flyscreen in order to make travelling under windy conditions more bearable.
As regards the possibilty of "killing oneself", this can be associated with
all motorcycles regardless of the size of engine.At the end of the day, it is the riders responsibility to do their utmost to avoid this including wearing suitable clothing and learning to ride in a more restricted area before venturing out onto the major highways.
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Old 11-30-2012, 08:10 AM   #27 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DennisVR View Post
Hi,

(first paragraphs as posted in welcome center)

At the age of 41 i've decided that it's time to get my motorcycle license. I've driven a 50cc bike when i was 16-19, and i feel my muscle memory is still present. So it shouldn't be too much of a problem getting the hang of it again.

I intend to drive for pleasure and commuting. One way is about 50kms(30miles) including 30kms(20miles) freeway. But only when the weather's good.

I've have set my eyes on a Bonneville. For it's looks and forgiving torque curve.

I have quite a few friends who are into motorcycles. And i've asked there opinions on the Bonneville for me as a beginner. And gotten following remarks:
- No ABS
- Too heavy for a beginner
- Underpowered
- Naked bikes are not a good idea for the freeway

I would like to get opinions from Bonneville riders, who can tell first hand if these remarks are valid or not.

Thanks!
There have been a lot of great comments here and a few goofy ones.

I started riding at 57 and have been through 4 bikes in 4 years of riding. Here are my recommendations. First of all, take the MSF beginner rider course.

Like many others, I'd recommend you start on a smaller bike. I started on a 250 and my only regret is that I bought it new and took a real bath we I sold it. It enabled me to hone my skills on an easy to ride bike. Look for a used bike in decent shape. You can develop your skills and if you had negotiated a good price at the time of purchase you can recoupe most or all of you money. My 250 lasted 6 months. I go as big as a Suzuki S40 (older models were called Suzuki Savage). Another good started would be a Honda Shadow VLX. It's a bit heavier but it's very low to the ground.

ABS would be nice, but no big deal not having it if you practice your skills a bit.

Underpowered? Balderdash. There is no reason you would ever need a bike with more power. You might want it, but you'll never need it.

Naked not good on the freeway? What??? Once again, Balderdash. Bike with big fairings do offer more protection from the elements but you say you only plan to ride in good weather.

There are bikes that do some things better than the Bonnie, but there is no better jack-of-all-trades bike than the Bonnie. It is pretty much the perfect bike if you are only going to have one bike. Of the four bikes I've had and the two my wife has had, the Bonnie is the best by far.

I'd probably recommend the SE or base Bonnie unless you prefer the styling of the T-100. I believe they handle a bit better, smaller front wheel and all.

Whatever you get, take your time getting out in traffic. You are invisible out there and everyone it trying to kill you. Traffic is the one place where being paranoid is a good idea. Stay on the side roads until your skills develop. Deserted parking lots are a great place to practice slow speed skills.

Good luck!! Keep us posted on your purchase a how you are coming along.
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Old 11-30-2012, 08:31 AM   #28 (permalink)
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DennisVR, my first question to you is, don't you have a graduated license system in Belgium? I know in other European countries you just can't go out and ride any size bike you want.
As far as a Bonneville as a first bike I think it's a great choice. Size wise I believe it's perfect. Low seat height and a neutral sitting position. Power depends on you and your throttle control. The Bonneville isn't a 1000cc rocket. You can control it very easily. My first bike was a 1974 Honda CB450. When I look back at the 450 it was a similar weight and power curve. The Bonneville is great because it will fit you needs for a long time.
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Old 11-30-2012, 11:12 AM   #29 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vzshadow View Post
There have been a lot of great comments here and a few goofy ones.

I started riding at 57 and have been through 4 bikes in 4 years of riding. Here are my recommendations. First of all, take the MSF beginner rider course.

Like many others, I'd recommend you start on a smaller bike. I started on a 250 and my only regret is that I bought it new and took a real bath we I sold it. It enabled me to hone my skills on an easy to ride bike. Look for a used bike in decent shape. You can develop your skills and if you had negotiated a good price at the time of purchase you can recoupe most or all of you money. My 250 lasted 6 months. I go as big as a Suzuki S40 (older models were called Suzuki Savage). Another good started would be a Honda Shadow VLX. It's a bit heavier but it's very low to the ground.

ABS would be nice, but no big deal not having it if you practice your skills a bit.

Underpowered? Balderdash. There is no reason you would ever need a bike with more power. You might want it, but you'll never need it.

Naked not good on the freeway? What??? Once again, Balderdash. Bike with big fairings do offer more protection from the elements but you say you only plan to ride in good weather.

There are bikes that do some things better than the Bonnie, but there is no better jack-of-all-trades bike than the Bonnie. It is pretty much the perfect bike if you are only going to have one bike. Of the four bikes I've had and the two my wife has had, the Bonnie is the best by far.

I'd probably recommend the SE or base Bonnie unless you prefer the styling of the T-100. I believe they handle a bit better, smaller front wheel and all.

Whatever you get, take your time getting out in traffic. You are invisible out there and everyone it trying to kill you. Traffic is the one place where being paranoid is a good idea. Stay on the side roads until your skills develop. Deserted parking lots are a great place to practice slow speed skills.

Good luck!! Keep us posted on your purchase a how you are coming along.
All good advice here, but this post can be taken to the bank. It's right on, IMO. Again, if your not sure, buy used (and small).
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Old 11-30-2012, 04:27 PM   #30 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magwitch View Post
The original query was regarding comments made by others which included, too heavy, underpowered and the suitability of "naked bikes" as regards travelling on the freeway.
I was merely suggesting that the Street Triple addressed some of these issues, namely, lighter, ample performance, with the option of fitting a factory flyscreen in order to make travelling under windy conditions more bearable.
As regards the possibilty of "killing oneself", this can be associated with
all motorcycles regardless of the size of engine.At the end of the day, it is the riders responsibility to do their utmost to avoid this including wearing suitable clothing and learning to ride in a more restricted area before venturing out onto the major highways.
Fair enough and true what you say, Magwitch. I will own my bias. I think powerful bikes (I put the Str 3 in that category) in the hands of inexperienced riders on the street greatly increases the chance of going into a corner too hot. "Pilot error", not other motor vehicles is the culprit in the vast majority of serious accidents involving novice riders. It's just too easy to make a mistake when your new bike goes from zero to Holy Sh*t in an eyeblink.

I've been riding for a long time with many miles on fast bikes and I consider myself a competent street rider. A couple of years ago I took a long test ride for fun on a Street Triple while my Duc was getting serviced. During that ride, I had a lapse in concentration and carried too much speed into a corner and crossed the center line, but fortunately there didn't happen to be anybody coming the other way.

We've had many spirited discussions on this forum that veer into the topic of individual rights, including the right to buy a bike way faster than your current skills can handle. I think that's a bad idea and I think a Bonneville approaches the power limit of what most new riders can safely deal with.

Sorry about my sarcastic response in my other post.
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