spray-bombing wheels - Triumph Forum: Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums
» Main Menu

Discussion Forums
 » Twins
 » Tiger
 » General
 » RAT

Features
 » Blogs

Motorcycle.com Links

Contribute
 » Photo

Motorcycle Forums
» Insurance
» Sponsors
» Our Partners
»ATV Reviews
»Motorcycle Games

Club Cafe' Cafe Racers; the Thruxton and other custom cafe styled bikes.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-24-2012, 12:42 AM   #1 (permalink)
Senior Member
Formula Extreme
Main Motorcycle: '05 Triumph Bonneville
 
Craigore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 450
Other Motorcycle: '51 Harley Panhead
Extra Motorcycle: '74 RD350
spray-bombing wheels

Just wondering what success people have had with sandblasting, priming, and "spray-bombing" or "rattlecanning" their wheels/hubs. Yes, the correct way to do this is to de-lace and have everything powder coated- but no one in my area re-laces wheels. I have built bicycle wheels and am familiar with "dish"- or "offset", spoke tension, etc... I'd rather not ship everything to have it done. Was thinking about doing it myself with one of those Harbor Freight truing stands but am weary about the results.
Craigore is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 11-24-2012, 07:18 AM   #2 (permalink)
triumphrat.net Vendor
World SuperBike
 
Retro-Racer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,039
I've never seen good looking results with rattle can painted wheels. It's very difficult to mask the spokes where they lace to the hub. Secondly, rattle can paint is not very durable and scratches/peels easily.

If you do try it, use quality automotive paint such as Dupli-color or SEM. Both brands sell an Adhesion Promoter, essentially a clear primer. Absolutely use it on all spray projects.

I recently sprayed a speedometer drive unit gloss black with Dupli-color engine enamel with fantastic results.

/M
__________________
"With integrity, nothing else matters. Without integrity, nothing else matters."
Retro-Racer is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-24-2012, 08:45 AM   #3 (permalink)
Senior Member
Moto Grand Prix
Main Motorcycle: 2004 Thruxton
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan
Posts: 2,692
Other Motorcycle: 1954 BMW R25/3
Extra Motorcycle: 1971 CB350
What Mike said. Lacing wheels isn't hard. You own a panhead, so working on this little project is cakewalk in comparison to normal maintance on that baby...

Regards,

--Rich
beemerrich is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-24-2012, 09:21 AM   #4 (permalink)
Senior Member
Formula Extreme
Main Motorcycle: 06 Thruxton
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Winter Park, FL USA
Posts: 556
Other Motorcycle: '69 Bonneville
Extra Motorcycle: '71 Bonneville
I have observed two things about lacing wheels.(Disclaimer: No expert, just a guy who has done it a couple of times).

First, the use of a dial indicator is very helpful. At first blush, it would seem that this only helps get the wheel dead on during the last final adjustments. However, what I find is that it more easily helps you observe the small changes that occur as you start bringing the wheel into alignment. In other words, if you need to move a spot on the wheel in some direction, the dial indicator will let you know right away if you are going in the right direction. Harbor Freight has a cheap one for around $35 or you could invest in a better one if you have need.

Second, you need a good straight wheel to start with. I have frustrated myself no end trying to true a wheel, the hoop of which had weaves and lumps in it.

So, if you are thinking about breaking down your wheel, just for painting, and reassembling, you might want to check to see how straight it was to begin with. If you know it was really true before, then you should be able to get it back after reassembling. But it it's a lot more wobbly than you realized at least you will know what's the best you should be able to expect.

And, as Retro-Racer mentioned, rattle can paint is usually not very durable as it is usually a type of lacquer and quite soft. However, hubs are pretty well protected and usually will only get wear and tear from reassembly and then cleaning. Just be sure you properly clean and prime prior to painting. Given the time and work of disassembling and reassembling wheels. better paint might be worth the cost.

Here is what I did...

http://artshobbyprojects.com/%2771wheels.htm


Art.
BirdoPrey is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-24-2012, 11:27 AM   #5 (permalink)
Senior Member
Formula Extreme
Main Motorcycle: '05 Triumph Bonneville
 
Craigore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 450
Other Motorcycle: '51 Harley Panhead
Extra Motorcycle: '74 RD350
Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdoPrey View Post
I have observed two things about lacing wheels.(Disclaimer: No expert, just a guy who has done it a couple of times).

First, the use of a dial indicator is very helpful. At first blush, it would seem that this only helps get the wheel dead on during the last final adjustments. However, what I find is that it more easily helps you observe the small changes that occur as you start bringing the wheel into alignment. In other words, if you need to move a spot on the wheel in some direction, the dial indicator will let you know right away if you are going in the right direction. Harbor Freight has a cheap one for around $35 or you could invest in a better one if you have need.

Second, you need a good straight wheel to start with. I have frustrated myself no end trying to true a wheel, the hoop of which had weaves and lumps in it.

So, if you are thinking about breaking down your wheel, just for painting, and reassembling, you might want to check to see how straight it was to begin with. If you know it was really true before, then you should be able to get it back after reassembling. But it it's a lot more wobbly than you realized at least you will know what's the best you should be able to expect.

And, as Retro-Racer mentioned, rattle can paint is usually not very durable as it is usually a type of lacquer and quite soft. However, hubs are pretty well protected and usually will only get wear and tear from reassembly and then cleaning. Just be sure you properly clean and prime prior to painting. Given the time and work of disassembling and reassembling wheels. better paint might be worth the cost.

Here is what I did...

http://artshobbyprojects.com/%2771wheels.htm


Art.
Hey! Thanks for that post! I have dial indicator with a magnetic base, that's an interesting way to true a wheel but I might try it!
Think i'm going to do it myself this winter

Anyone have spec on spoke torque? I suppose as long as they're not loose on one side and tight on the other, i'll be fine.
Craigore is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-25-2012, 07:23 AM   #6 (permalink)
Senior Member
Formula Extreme
Main Motorcycle: 06 Thruxton
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Winter Park, FL USA
Posts: 556
Other Motorcycle: '69 Bonneville
Extra Motorcycle: '71 Bonneville
Hi Craigore,

I dug out the paper work that I got from Buchanan Spoke and Wheel. It did not include a clear answer to your question "anyone have a spec on spoke torque?".

The instructions were minimal with a caution against not getting them tight enough.

From what I can understand about spokes, they can be viewed as a type of bolt. The purpose of "preload" is to prevent the "bolt" from stretching under load. If the spoke is not preloaded enough it will flex if the load exceeds the preload and, according to Buchanan, cause the spoke to break at the head.

All this makes very good sense however, it would be nice if it could be translated into actual numbers that you could use. Unfortunately, the only number that I see in the paper work references "large displacement cycles" which it says should be torqued to "in excess of 80 inch pounds". And, according to them will require the use of "a close fitting 6"to 8" wrench".

All of this is not very helpful as one would need to know what gauge spoke was being used with "large displacement cycles" and then be able to adjust the torque setting to the gauge of spoke you are working with. Furthermore, it would be important to reduce any additional friction such as is found in the nipple head to rim contact point as this would throw your figures off.

In the end, I did basically what you suggested, tried to tighten them evenly to a firm torque and figured I will check them after riding a bit. Not very scientific but it's all I've got.

Art.

Last edited by BirdoPrey; 11-25-2012 at 10:29 AM.
BirdoPrey is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-25-2012, 11:16 AM   #7 (permalink)
Super Moderator
Site Supporter
Nova
Main Motorcycle: Custom 955 Speed-Tona
 
DEcosse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Pleasanton CA
Posts: 16,915
Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdoPrey View Post
Enjoyed reading your whole blog on the Triumph project - well done!
DEcosse is online now   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-25-2012, 11:56 AM   #8 (permalink)
Senior Member
Formula Extreme
Main Motorcycle: '05 Triumph Bonneville
 
Craigore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 450
Other Motorcycle: '51 Harley Panhead
Extra Motorcycle: '74 RD350
Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdoPrey View Post
Hi Craigore,

I dug out the paper work that I got from Buchanan Spoke and Wheel. It did not include a clear answer to your question "anyone have a spec on spoke torque?".

The instructions were minimal with a caution against not getting them tight enough.

From what I can understand about spokes, they can be viewed as a type of bolt. The purpose of "preload" is to prevent the "bolt" from stretching under load. If the spoke is not preloaded enough it will flex if the load exceeds the preload and, according to Buchanan, cause the spoke to break at the head.

All this makes very good sense however, it would be nice if it could be translated into actual numbers that you could use. Unfortunately, the only number that I see in the paper work references "large displacement cycles" which it says should be torqued to "in excess of 80 inch pounds". And, according to them will require the use of "a close fitting 6"to 8" wrench".

All of this is not very helpful as one would need to know what gauge spoke was being used with "large displacement cycles" and then be able to adjust the torque setting to the gauge of spoke you are working with. Furthermore, it would be important to reduce any additional friction such as is found in the nipple head to rim contact point as this would throw your figures off.

In the end, I did basically what you suggested, tried to tighten them evenly to a firm torque and figured I will check them after riding a bit. Not very scientific but it's all I've got.

Art.

Thanks for clearing that up.
Craigore is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-26-2012, 08:28 PM   #9 (permalink)
Senior Member
Powerbike
Main Motorcycle: 2007 Triumph Thruxton
 
andrewp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Vancouver BC, Canada
Posts: 366
i highly suggest removing the wheels/hubs and powder coat them properly.

but if you wanted to see what they would look like, you could just plastidip them, lots of people do that to car wheels without even removing them, i've even seen entire cars plastidipped... just do a search. it's by no means a permanent solution as any nick or tear you will have to peel it off and do it again. but its cheap (couple bucks a can). You don't need to sand/prime just make sure the surface is clean (maybe tape off the spokes/tire and trim carefully with a blade. it's a neat product, i went on a bit of a rampage and sprayed all sorts of random stuff around the house lol.

ap
andrewp is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-27-2012, 10:04 AM   #10 (permalink)
Senior Member
World SuperBike
Main Motorcycle: 10 Street Triple R
 
Thrux-ton-up's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: North Georgia
Posts: 2,337
Other Motorcycle: 05 Bonnie Cafe
Going to all the trouble of disassembly and re-lacing, why not powder coat then? The cost if you shop around should not be too high. I did these 2 rims last week for a cafe CB750. Powder is super durable.
__________________

John W. '10 Street Triple R, '05 Bonneville Cafe.
My original Album My Pics
Thrux-ton-up is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Triumph Forum: Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter your valid email address, that can receive an automated confirmation message. Otherwise, you won't be able to gain full access.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Early Trophy wheels verses later 17" wheels esox Trophy 5 12-30-2011 09:31 PM
Oil spray ? david_in_ky Classic, Vintage & Veteran 19 05-19-2011 09:18 AM
Dyno on the spray! bonnieblackinfl Twins Technical Talk 6 03-22-2007 12:43 AM

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.2

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:14 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Motorcycle News, Videos and Reviews
Honda Grom Forum Harley Davidson Forum Honda 600RR Kawasaki Forum Yamaha R6 Forum Yamaha FZ-09 Forum
1199 Panigale Forum Roadglide Forum Honda CBR1000 Forum Vulcan Forum Yamaha R1 Forum Yamaha R3 Forum
Ducati Monster Forum Harley Forums Honda CBR250R Forum ZX10R Forum Star Raider Forum Yamaha Viking Forum
Suzuki GSXR Forum V-Rod Forums Honda Shadow Forum Kawasaki Motorcycle Forum Star Warrior Forum KTM Duke 390 Forum
SV650 Forum BMW S1000RR Forum Honda Fury Forum Kawasaki Versys Forum Drag Racing Forum Ducati 899 Panigale Forum
Suzuki V-Strom BMW K1600 Triumph Forum Victory Forums Sportbikes BMW NineT Forum
Volusia Forum BMW F800 Forum Triumph 675 Forum MV Agusta Forum HD Street Forum Suzuki GW250 Forum
Yamaha Motorcycles Victory Gunner Forum Honda Vultus Forum HD LiveWire Forum Ninja H2 Forum Ducati Scrambler Forum

Garage Plus vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.